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  1.  
    mrotown:Anyone done a 650b conversion?

    i've both done one in a shop and helped a friend do one outside a shop but have never done it for personal use. the biggest obstacle is brake reach, though the "fixie conversion" movement is making long reach calipers easier to find. in terms of actual touring practicality, if you've got a spare tire and extra spokes... it'd be pretty rad. tube size doesn't really matter, and it'd actually make it easier to stretch/jam the wrong size tube into your wheel in a pinch/if you don't give a fuck (and we don't give a fuck). also, if you're thinking about doing it with a standard road bike (with shortish chainstays) make sure you've got a long enough rack to be able to mount your rear panniers back far enough to not have heel strike.
    •  
      CommentAuthormrotown
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2011
     
    Hmmmm I hadn't considered the heal strike. That might be the deal killer.
    I'm thinking that it would probably be an awesome solution if I was shorter.
    I'm going to be compromising on a lot of things for not a lot of gain.
    What size were the ones you dealt with?
    I actually have a set of Paul Racers in my parts bin, so quality brakes with the right reach shouldn't be an issue.e-f-f-e-c-t a smooth operater operating correctly
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2011
     
    Does anybody have any favorite solutions or gear recommendations for ultralight touring? I'm thinking: no cooking gear, a light blanket + emergency mylar for colder nights, hammock tent. Basically I'd want to go as far as possible with as little as possible. Suggestions?Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
  2.  
    tinfoil is excellent as a cooking utensil, and can be had for free from most burrito places.Naaaah, too uncool for the #messlyfe. I just like to hang out in loading docks and pretend to talk on my radio so that people will like me. - Mfratt
  3.  
    nerdo:Does anybody have any favorite solutions or gear recommendations for ultralight touring? I'm thinking: no cooking gear, a light blanket + emergency mylar for colder nights, hammock tent. Basically I'd want to go as far as possible with as little as possible. Suggestions?


    do you mean no cooking gear as in buying/dumpstering and eatingraw/cookingoverfire? because for the price of a couple hours of your time and some rubbing alcohol you can make a superlight beer can stove that's pretty damn efficient and weighs next to nothing. IIRC, howl's got a great recipe for one but i might be making that up.

    mylar blankets are awesome backup anyway, so i'd definitely recommend one as an ultralight blanket.
  4.  
    mrotown:Hmmmm I hadn't considered the heal strike. That might be the deal killer.
    I'm thinking that it would probably be an awesome solution if I was shorter.
    I'm going to be compromising on a lot of things for not a lot of gain.
    What size were the ones you dealt with?
    I actually have a set of Paul Racers in my parts bin, so quality brakes with the right reach shouldn't be an issue.


    there are some prettttty long rear racks out there... i rode with an IRD khyber rack that was exceptionally long. i'd say you can get past it if you're conscientious of the potential issue, especially with where your bags are mounted on the rack, how big your feet are, and how long your cranks are. you do get a lot of perks our of it (lower BB, lower center of gravity, lower standover which helps for mounting/dismounting) and there isn't TOO much that you're compromising on if you're willing to carry more to compensate. i built one out of a 57cm road bike that my buddy wanted to handle like a road bike but fit bigger tires and fenders on. i also built one out of a 52 (i think) but i don't remember what the final application was for...
  5.  
    I think UN: it's jitensha did a wheel size conversion, but it might have been to 650c on a roadbike or somethingi mean that looks like a 10 cat bag, easy
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2011 edited
     
    clockwork ted:do you mean no cooking gear as in buying/dumpstering and eatingraw/cookingoverfire? because for the price of a couple hours of your time and some rubbing alcohol you can make a superlight beer can stove that's pretty damn efficient and weighs next to nothing. IIRC, howl's got a great recipe for one but i might be making that up.

    mylar blankets are awesome backup anyway, so i'd definitely recommend one as an ultralight blanket.


    By no cooking, I just mean that I'll probably be eating raw, things like bread and peanut butter and trail mix etc., to save the weight and space of cooking gear. I'm looking to ride from upstate NY to possibly northern Maine and back in mid-September. So it's not super long either way. But I'll probably be using it as a prep tour for something longer next year.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
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      CommentAuthorseanile mick
    • CommentTimeJul 6th 2011 edited
     
    well..if you're interested, here's the soda can stove.
    you could look at vegetarian diets and see what sources of raw foods they use to keep nourished because the other folk usually rely on cooking for their protein.somebody turn the lights off on this place already.
    •  
      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeJul 7th 2011
     
    nerdo:Does anybody have any favorite solutions or gear recommendations for ultralight touring? I'm thinking: no cooking gear, a light blanket + emergency mylar for colder nights, hammock tent. Basically I'd want to go as far as possible with as little as possible. Suggestions?


    A tarp/bivy + pad + quilt/blanket is lighter than a hammock, and more versatile in in where it can be used. You don't really need a stove- you're probably going to be near places where you can get hot cooked food. If you want, an alcohol stove+fosters pot is light and cheap. see: http://www.jureystudio.com/pennystove/halfpenny.html

    Additional clothes are pretty weather dependent, though running shorts are pretty much always good, as they give you something to wear while you wash out bike gear.
    Water purification drops are really light, and can be great if you run out in the middle of nowhere.Troglodytarum is latin for troll
    • CommentAuthorben
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2011
     
    There's no way a tarp+pad+BLANKET are lighter or take up less space than a hammock. The first hammock I clicked on on REI's site is only 1.2lbs and packs down to the size of a softball. And I'm sure you can find even lighter.I have DTF pants. They're crotchless. -surprisefries
  6.  
    You're forgetting about the metal frame to hold it up.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  7.  
    ben:There's no way a tarp+pad+BLANKET are lighter or take up less space than a hammock. The first hammock I clicked on on REI's site is only 1.2lbs and packs down to the size of a softball. And I'm sure you can find even lighter.


    i thought the same thing, ben. maybe howl thought nerdo was talking about a regular rope hammock or something and not a camping/touring specific hammock. i looked into hammocks, specifically hennessy hammocks and they're pretty damn cool... but i couldn't guarantee i'd be able to set it up every night because i didn't know the landscape/flora where i was heading. i was pretty glad i opted for a freestanding tent in the long run, but if i was touring in new england i think it's a pretty viable option.
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2011
     
    Yeah, I have a Hennessey hammock already and it's pretty cozy. Since I won't be touring in any deserts or tundra anytime soon, I'm sure I'll be able to find two trees to string it around, though I'll probably need the extender straps for larger trees, just to maximize my sleeping opportunities. The biggest downfall to hammocks is keeping the underside warm in colder months, but there are solutions for that...Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
  8.  
    surprisefries:You're forgetting about the metal frame to hold it up.

    trees. and/or signs.Naaaah, too uncool for the #messlyfe. I just like to hang out in loading docks and pretend to talk on my radio so that people will like me. - Mfratt
    •  
      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2011
     
    ben:There's no way a tarp+pad+BLANKET are lighter or take up less space than a hammock. The first hammock I clicked on on REI's site is only 1.2lbs and packs down to the size of a softball. And I'm sure you can find even lighter.


    A silnylon tarp runs about 10-15 oz depending on size and line/stakes + another 10 oz for a sleeping pad. You'll probably need a blanket in either case, so that's a wash.

    The rei hammock doesn't have any rain protection, so you'll have to add a tarp in any case , and probably pack more insulation to deal with the heat lost through the bottom of the tarp.Troglodytarum is latin for troll
  9.  
    I was kidding
    DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthorjoeyfresh
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2011
     
    I lold.We'll get you a cat, don't worry -t-honks
    •  
      CommentAuthorjoeyfresh
    • CommentTimeJul 8th 2011
     
    I still need a good route between East Haven, CT and NYC. Anyone?We'll get you a cat, don't worry -t-honks
  10.  
    howl:
    ben:There's no way a tarp+pad+BLANKET are lighter or take up less space than a hammock. The first hammock I clicked on on REI's site is only 1.2lbs and packs down to the size of a softball. And I'm sure you can find even lighter.


    A silnylon tarp runs about 10-15 oz depending on size and line/stakes + another 10 oz for a sleeping pad. You'll probably need a blanket in either case, so that's a wash.

    The rei hammock doesn't have any rain protection, so you'll have to add a tarp in any case , and probably pack more insulation to deal with the heat lost through the bottom of the tarp.

    i was just provoking you howl, i figured you'd get metric and/or technical on us and back your statement up. in the case of a deluge, the hammock+rainfly wins every time.
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2011
     
    I'm very likely riding to Boston from Albany next weekend, probably camping in the middle Thursday night. Any suggestions for good places to stop? I'd figured on just ghetto-camping somewhere but I'm interested to hear about other options....Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    •  
      CommentAuthormrotown
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2011
     
    You must go to bombers while in Albany.
    Anytime I'm within 30 miles of there I make the trip.
    It makes me so sad for Burrito Max.e-f-f-e-c-t a smooth operater operating correctly
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      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2011
     
    Yeah man, I live 2 blocks from Bombers. Now that you mention it, maybe I'll grab a burrito before I go for some ride fuel!Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
  11.  
    what route are you going? if you're going through the northern part of mass i'd say to camp in satan's kingdom (near northfield, ma) just to say you did. also it'd be a pretty easy place to free camp iirc.
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      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2011
     
    Yeah, I was thinking the northern part, like roughly along 2A. Unrelated, has anybody ridden 2A through Western Mass? Is it rideable?

    Satan's Kingdom looks fun. I'll definitely check it out.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    • CommentAuthorgc
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2011 edited
     
    rob, this is pretty much the exact route i rode when i did a bunch of touring last summer:

    http://tinyurl.com/5uftadb

    all of it is extremely bike friendly- it's no route 9 to westborough and back
    the best stretch is from orange to princeton
    route 2 is really hilly from willamstown to shelburne

    uhh, you can camp [illegally] in any of the state forests that border route 2. no one will find you, especially so if you ride till dusk and leave at daybreak the next day.

    also the quabbin reservoir is really awesome and you can spend most of a day exploring the access roads that border it.

    the rubel's bike maps are really helpful.

    that may be more info that you wanted.gone
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeJul 9th 2011
     
    Awesome, Graham, that's exactly what I was looking for! I've done the drive from Albany to N. Adams a few times, so I know how hilly that area can be. Can't wait.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
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      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeJul 11th 2011
     
    Ok, yet another stupid question in the camping/touring thread: has anybody had luck with lashing a small stuff sack to your saddle/seatpost with a bungee? I'm fully aware that this is potentially a bad idea...Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
  12.  
    i think more than anything that'd just have the potential to piss me off by hitting my legs while i'm pedaling if it swings back and forth... i'd think it'd be better off mounted to your handlebars somehow. in theory, though, if you're rocking a dry compression sack that has a roll-top with clip (like this guy) you could probably clip it to your seat rails so it hangs vertically and then bungee it around your seatpost to stabilize it. i own and can vouch for one of those OR dry compression sacks. i'm fairly sure mine is 15L.
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeJul 12th 2011
     
    ^Aha! Thanks for the tip. I just picked one up from EMS. Best $25 I've ever spent.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
  13.  
    ^awesome. mine held my down bag and inflatable sleeping pad for my Patagonia tour and was indispensable. i don't know if it's fully submersible for very long but it's very well made and held up to a lot of use.
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeAug 9th 2011
     
    Hey people, I might be doing some kind of overnight ride/camp/minitour next weekend. Anybody wanna join up? I was thinking of maybe doing a long loop in Vermont (maybe incorporating Six Gaps). I basically have no plans but I do have a car and I have a tent. So, yeah.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    • CommentAuthorgc
    • CommentTimeAug 9th 2011 edited
     
    ride to d2r2, ride d2r2, ride home.
    edit: that's in 2 weekends.gone
    •  
      CommentAuthorwest.
    • CommentTimeFeb 29th 2012 edited
     
    So, figured I'd resurrect this thread seeing as how I'm touring down to NYC <b>NEXT FUCKING FRIDAY</b> for my spring break and haven't done any planning at all.

    My second time doing this. Last time I went I went via Providence/CT/Long Island. I had nothing planned then either, ended up stealthing it on the side of some random roads, riding on the breakdown lane of I-95 out of Providence before getting pulled over by a cop and generally making it to NYC by the skin of my teeth.

    In any case, I want to ride out to Western Mass, camping along the way, do some hiking on the Mass section of the Appalachian Trail, then cross over into NY and head down to the city before taking a bus back to beantown.

    Supplies and bike related stuff are a non-issue, I have everything I need, I'm more concerned about routing, I ended up in some sketchy places last time and I'd rather avoid them if at all possible... (I'm looking at you Springfield). I'll be camping along the way.

    So, thoughts?unstuck in time
    •  
      CommentAuthorxbobeahenx
    • CommentTimeFeb 29th 2012
     
    that sounds awesome.Except our own thoughts, there is nothing absolutely in our power.
    •  
      CommentAuthordora
    • CommentTimeMar 1st 2012
     
    that sounds awesome
    idk how far west your rode on LI when you toured there (how close to the city) but it can get ugly
    i usually hate the way google maps recommends bike routes
    but i just google mapped boston to new york, new york and i'm into it. the way they recommend getting into NYC anyway
    figure it out to new haven and then take the path all the way along the water in southern CT - it's super pretty
    and the way they go seems the best way to do it through southern CT into NYC. And it takes you through the bronx versus coming in through queens. might be longer to get to brooklyn but way better bike-friendly-wise, in my opinion, anyway.Must be awful, being so fluffy.
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      CommentAuthorwest.
    • CommentTimeMar 1st 2012 edited
     
    Last time I went almost directly south into providence, west to teh border of RI and CT, down to westerly, then over to new london. Took the ferry across to teh easternmost point of Long island (orient point) and then a long diagonal all the way into NYC proper. You're right, the roads get nasty nearer the city.

    This time, my tentative plan is due west out to Great Barrington/North Hampton, hiking a bit, then out into new york state, following the hudson river valley (this route) all the way into the city. Around 320 miles in all, +/- getting lost.

    That is, if I can get a replacement cam buckle for my broken ortlieb...unstuck in time
    • CommentAuthorspokenword
    • CommentTimeMar 1st 2012 edited
     
    I've ridden out west a few times. You can take the first 3 pages of this cue sheet to get you to Westfield, and dodging most of the crap around Springfield, then climb over Jacob's Ladder via US 20 into Stockbridge then head south to Great Barrington from there.

    (edited to add: @ mile 40.5 of the second leg, Atkins Market in Amherst. The last time that I was there they had Cider Doughnut Bread Pudding. SO GOOD.)

    As far as camping goes, I did a four-day solo backpack in Mt Washington State Park near Great Barrington and found the AT section to be good fun, but mostly setup for point-to-point hikes, so if you're more interested in some kind of loop around NY with minimal amounts of doubling back, you probably ought to check out Alander Mountain to the west, and Bash Bish Falls. Campsites there are nicely situated for loops into NY or CT and/or there's a cabin near the top that's first-come, first-served and gives you good access to the summit. Campsites in MA are a little more rustic/primitive than on the NY side. The NY camps at Bash Bish are mostly populated with car campers, whereas the MA camps are a 1.5 mile hike in.
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2012
     
    Whoa, give me a shout when you get near NY state. I live in Albany during the week and have ridden a lot of roads around here. If it's a M-Th, I might be able to swing a day off and ride with you a bit of the way...Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    •  
      CommentAuthorwest.
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2012 edited
     
    ^^, the cue sheet and campsite info is just the sort of thing I was looking for, sweet! Where exactly does it start? Concord?

    Right now I'm shooting to climb Mount Greylock, then heading down to NYC. It's so hard to plan out the logistics of hiking/biking without a vehicle sometimes... thanks for the info.

    @Nerdo: I'll definitely give you a holler when/if I make it to Albany area. All my plans are a bit up in the air at the moment; the lady friend might join me on the tour but she doesn't have the week off like I do for spring break, so if she does we'd be hoofing it fast as possible diagonally from boston to NYC Friday-Monday, ie, no western mass/albany-nyc...

    but, updates once i figure out what's actually happening. hah.unstuck in time
    • CommentAuthorspokenword
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2012 edited
     
    cue sheet starts @ the parking lot of the Hanscom Civilian Air Terminal.

    Regarding camping on Greylock -- I found that the main road up to the top (which leads you to the main Sperry campground) was a little tight and narrow (and possibly tighter and narrower and unplowed in the winter). It would be doable on an unladen road bike, but I'd think twice about riding up on a touring rig. Camping at Sperry is pretty standard Mass DCR stuff -- spacious, picnic table, easy access to water, firepit and wood on sale at camp entrance. Alternative campsites that are an easy hike-in would be an open dispersed camping field by Money Brook on the northwestern edge of the reservation (not on the official DCR map, trailhead @ Hopper Road) or the Wilbur's Clearing shelter on the northern edge near Notch Road (though Notch Road may also be unplowed and I can't comment on tightness or steepness if you're coming up that way as I haven't been on Notch Road itself).

    If you do camp @ Wilbur's Clearing, do yourself a favor and get up to the outlook at the junction of the Mt Prospect trail and the AT for sunset. One of the best sunsets ever.
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2012
     
    ^Yeah man, let me know. I'd be extremely down for doing the Greylock climb with you. I've biked all around that mountain without actually climbing it.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
  14.  
    Greylock is awesome... I'm dying to find a day to go drag the baby up the Cheshire Harbor Trail (not too difficult, it's a snowmobile trail).
    •  
      CommentAuthorwest.
    • CommentTimeMar 6th 2012
     
    Sooo... ladyfriend is joining me on the tour. Avoiding Western mass this time around. Mt. Greylock will have to wait.

    Probably for a long weekend or summer if anybody's interested. Camping will be involved. Beer too. Also, ramen.

    Finalized route:

    Day 1, March 9th: across mass/ct to stafford springs, warm-showers host (confirmed) there, camping in his yard
    day 2, march 10th: reach new haven, warm showers or couch surfing or camping (pending, to be determined)
    day 3, march 11th: NYC, crash for the night friend's house.
    day 4+: ??? shenanigans??? Philly? Washington DC? IDK, something.
    March 18th: bus back to bostonunstuck in time
  15.  
    west.:Probably for a long weekend or summer if anybody's interested. Camping will be involved. Beer too. Also, ramen.


    I'm really interested in something(s) like this this summer. I've also been thinking about taking a week to do some local touring this summerI thought that might be you! But there was no shimmy-shake so I couldn't be sure.
    • CommentAuthoringsy
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2012
     
    Any suggestions for S240 (sub 24 hour overnight) locations? I want to do a few of these this summer. I am thinking Wompatuck in Hingham should be good. Would also like some places with good sunset/sunrise views for taking pictures. Thanks!
    • CommentAuthorroburrito
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2012
     
    Salisbury beach. About 50 miles each way, you can extend it to around 60-65 miles if you go out to glouchester. Camp on the beach!

    A few spokes shy of a wheel.
    •  
      CommentAuthorwest.
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2012
     
    The Gloucester ride is really nice, really scenic. I had the best breakfast sandwhich in my entire life in one of the towns between here and Gloucester about two years ago, can't remember where. It may have been because I was starving, but goddamn i'm going to find that place again this summer.unstuck in time
    • CommentAuthorroburrito
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2012
     
    I swear the donut I had from Market Basket in Newburyport on that ride was the best donut I've ever eaten. Either the north shore makes amazing food or touring makes you hungry.A few spokes shy of a wheel.
    • CommentAuthoringsy
    • CommentTimeApr 22nd 2012
     
    Salisbury Beach looks great. Thanks for the recommendation. Cheers, Matt