Not signed in (Sign In)

Category Filter

Welcome, Guest

Want to take part in these discussions? Sign in if you have an account, or apply for one below

Vanilla 1.1.8 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

    •  
      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    hey. so i'm working on this research project for school and i have to make a poster. most people are just doing literature reviews of existing research but, in addition to pre-existing research, i'd like to make a new point and i need to have something to back it up with. hence, i have designed a survey to illustrate my idea.

    i'm kinda last-minute with it b/c it's taken me some time to a) realize i had to do a survey if i wanted to continue along with the same topic and b) work out a survey that i could quantify the results of. so if you wouldn't mind, i would really appreciate it if you would fill out the survey. it would help me times a million and it's super-short, five questions, that are mostly yes or no answers. and if you could get it back to me ASAP, i'd love you that much more. you can either re-post it, whisper it to me, or email it to me at kling.l@neu.edu. thanks!

    Please answer the following questions:
    Would you consider yourself a cyclist? [y/n]

    If you answered “yes” above, would you consider you and your fellow cyclists to be a “family” of sorts? [y/n]

    Do you ever greet or talk to fellow cyclists as you pass, even if you don’t know them? [y/n]

    Imagine you’re walking and pass a person, also walking, who is likely to be a cyclist (carrying a helmet, has a bike-specific bag w/ lights clipped to it, has clipless shoes on, is walking a bike, or in some way appears to be a cyclist). You don’t know this person but recognize that they probably ride a bike. Are you more likely to smile at them or acknowledge them in some way than you would a pedestrian who did not appear to be a cyclist? [y/n]

    If you were to pass either a motorist stopped on the side of the road or a cyclist stopped, who would you be more inclined to stop for and offer help/check to make sure they’re ok (note: even if you would stop for both, who would you be more inclined to stop for)? [motorist/cyclist]


    thanks again! if you'd like to know more about what i'm doing my poster on, whisper at me and i'll let you know. it's for my sociobiology class.
  1.  
    q 1- yes
    q 2-yes
    q 3-no
    q 4-yes
    q 5-cyclistride bikes for money not for fun(unless your drunk)
    • CommentAuthorjohnderson
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    Yes
    Yes
    If any sort of acknowledgement such as a head nod or smile is considered a greeting then yes.
    Yes
    Cyclist.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMorgie
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    Y
    Y
    Y
    Y
    cyclist
    • CommentAuthorHowardR
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    Y
    Y
    Y
    Y
    cyclist
    •  
      CommentAuthoraarn
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    1) Yesssss
    2) Sure...united against the evil cagers.
    3) Yeah
    4) Yes
    5) Cyclist(moscow)
  2.  
    y
    y
    head nod/wave/smile/whatever/y?
    y
    cyclistYou're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
    • CommentAuthorraff I el
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    1-4 yes
    5 cyclist.Geryon was a monster everything about him was red.
    • CommentAuthorgc
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    yes
    yes
    yes
    yes
    cyclist

    i am curious to what the topic is/more infogone
    •  
      CommentAuthorg0balistik
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    Y
    Y
    N
    N
    cyclist
    •  
      CommentAuthorbrandonc
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    the social scientist in me is skeptical as to the external validity of this survey, given your population choice & sampling method. are there more dimensions to this? if this shows up as evidence in some cheesy mass-media article about how cyclists are snobby & insular, i'm going to be mad! :)

    regardless, i'll submit:

    yes
    no
    yes
    no
    cyclist
    •  
      CommentAuthorgregwhits
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    1) y
    2) n
    3) n
    4) y
    5) cyclist
    • CommentAuthorboundgear
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    Y 1-4\ Cyclist 5
    • CommentAuthorslowski
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    y
    n
    n
    n
    cyclistIf at first you don't succeed... you fail.
    • CommentAuthorkanst
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    n
    n
    n
    y
    cyclist
    •  
      CommentAuthorpapi
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    the correct answers are:
    y
    n
    y
    n
    cyclist
    some people clearly haven't been studying their cyclist manual.I'm going to eat your brain and gain your knowledge
  3.  
    Y
    N
    Y
    Y
    Cyclist[all your base are belong to us]
  4.  
    N
    N
    Y
    N
    CyclistPh'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMungoRocks
    • CommentTimeNov 25th 2007
     
    Y
    N
    Y
    Y
    Cyclist, but only because I don't have either tools or know-how to help a stranded motorist.dongpincher 1000
    •  
      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    i lurve you guys! if you haven't filled this out yet, please please do!

    and you can chillax, brandon. i know it's not the best method but i'm somewhat limited, given the means i have of presenting any data.

    basically, i'm looking at altruism in humans. the big excuses for altruistic behavior among humans are pretty much the same as for animals: kin selection, mutualism, and reciprocity, with an emphasis on kin selection & reciprocity.

    i've always been interested altruistic behavior among all animal populations and, after reading a lot of vonnegut books, noticed that he consistently argues for the importance of family. one of his books, slapstick, is pretty out there but one of the characters runs for president of the united states and his main promise is to "create" families. he proposes to assign everyone an extra middle name with a number, like dandelion 17 or something like that. anyone else who is a dandelion is a "sibling", and any other name + 17 is a "cousin". his campaign slogan is "lonesome no more". basically the country goes to shit for a variety of reasons but b/c of the "extended families" everyone is super nice to each other, since you never know when you're talking to a "sibling" or "cousin".

    like i said, a little far-fetched. but ever since i read it, i started thinking about how we sort of contrive "families" for ourselves based on prominent interests or behaviors. and i've noticed since i started cycling that people who i don't know will smile or say hi to me, or that it's easier to strike up a conversation with a fellow cyclist who is a stranger than a stranger you don't easily associate with.

    so what i'm trying to argue is yes, we act altruistically based on kin selection and yes, reciprocity accounts for a lot of altruistic behavior when you're not genetically related. but additionally, we contrive "families" based on associations we make with others and are more likely to initiate altruistic behavior with someone in that "family" than a total stranger.

    this assignment is kinda bullshit. it's a cool idea to have us do posters but it's hard b/c it's not in addition to a paper, we have about a 2'x3' space to do a basic overview of what will be for most people a light literature review. i don't like regurgitating other people's ideas but i don't know that vonnegut's book would be considered a legitimate source. so i just needed to do a survey to put in my "methods" section and be able to say, "the majority of cyclists believe blah blah blah..." and maybe throw in a "this % of cyclists feel...". i just wanted an example "family" and i figured this would be an easy way to get a survey out there. i kept trying to think of a way to do a broad survey that i could pass out to my class or something but it would have been hard to derive data from it that i could present in such a small space since the answers would be fairly varied. ok i'm done my babbling now. thanks again!
    • CommentAuthorgone
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    yes
    maybe
    no
    no
    Cyclist
    • CommentAuthorGrim Ryan
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    Please answer the following questions:
    Y
    Y
    Y
    N
    CyclistDuffman Can't Breathe
    • CommentAuthorGrim Ryan
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007 edited
     
    Woops. Double post.Duffman Can't Breathe
  5.  
    Yes
    No
    Yes
    No
    Cyclist

    "My research shows that 100% of people ride single speed bicycles, 92% have tattoos, 46% are vegans, and 73% shower less than twice a week."
    • CommentAuthorrichard q
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    yes
    yes
    sometimes
    yes
    cyclist
    •  
      CommentAuthorMiiike
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    y
    y
    y
    probably, but the same goes for any of my interests i guess.
    cyclistsports!
  6.  
    yes,
    yes,
    yes,
    yes,
    i might stop for the motorist depending on the situation/definatly stop and ask the cyclist of all is well

    -richthere ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    •  
      CommentAuthorHamburger
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    yes
    yes
    yes
    yes
    yes -- both equally, but i'd spend more time evaulating and/or assisting a cyclist -- but that's all hypotheticalPeople make decisions.
  7.  
    .
    • CommentAuthorJer
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    brandonc:the social scientist in me is skeptical as to the external validity of this survey, given your population choice & sampling method. are there more dimensions to this? if this shows up as evidence in some cheesy mass-media article about how cyclists are snobby & insular, i'm going to be mad! :)


    y
    kinda
    y
    y
    cyclist.. I consider a cyclist more approachable, and more willing to accept assistance. Also they are more likely to actually need help. A motorist almost always has a spare tire or AAA.

    Jeremy