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  1.  
    im heading to the west coast for a few days with my whip and want to know how you kids fly with your bikes and basic tools....wordthere ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
  2.  
    i do not have a fancy travel bag or anything either!there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
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      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    if ya have time, i'd say UPS.
  3.  
    i am pretty much just heading out to sanfran not knowing anyone so i have not place to ship it to, i just want to bring it on the plane and ride around, put it back on the plane when i head home.there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
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      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    check this:
    http://www.bikeaccess.net/bikeaccess/

    havin' your own whip in another town is so boss! have fun duder!
  4.  
    there are a few great tips on there, thanks man!there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    •  
      CommentAuthorstickyfoot
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007 edited
     
    Hey Rich, I have a Freight Baggage travel case you can borrow. It's designed to fit under the max size requirements for checked luggage so you shouldn't, in theory, have to pay the extra fees. It's worked for me every time. Jacob got charged one way when he borrowed it, but didn't the other way. Keep the weight under 50lbs and say there's a massage table in it or something. (Actually, I usually say "bike wheels" or something.) EDIT: You do have to remove the cranks and the fork in order for it to fit, but that's not very difficult in the long run.

    In fact, if anybody's flying with a track bike and wants to borrow it, I'll accept any reasonable offers for trade. It could save you as much as $180 in extra fees.MC Chunky Ice in da howse
    •  
      CommentAuthorstickyfoot
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    Also, if anybody wants to go the ghetto route, I can show you how to cut down a bike box to fit under the size requirements too. For that, you need to have two boxes, a wheel box and a cut-down bike box that fits your frame, sans fork, exactly (think parallelogram). Each will fit under the size requirements and you'll be golden. If you go this way, expect to have to build a new box every trip. The cardboard can't really withstand more than one round trip.MC Chunky Ice in da howse
  5.  
    If you have time and don't want to deal with putting it together, go to REI. They'll take it apart, box it, ship it, and put it together at any of their stores. I went Boston to SFO and then back from Eugene, OR and it worked beautifully.

    They charge $25 plus shipping. Ended up being about $65 each way. Beautiful part is that you don't have to deal with it at the airport, no tools needed, no packing materials.
    •  
      CommentAuthorstickyfoot
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    Trying to merge the useful info into this one thread:

    Here's what said in that other thread:Where are you going? Just store it wherever you're staying, or wherever you'll be staying right before you leave to come back. You won't need it during the trip itself.

    This case is semi-soft. It has thin plastic walls with cordura glued to the outside. Here's a picture of one:

    MC Chunky Ice in da howse
  6.  
    good helpin rob!there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
  7.  
    endurancenirvana:If you have time and don't want to deal with putting it together, go to REI. They'll take it apart, box it, ship it, and put it together at any of their stores. I went Boston to SFO and then back from Eugene, OR and it worked beautifully.


    i have never been to sf so i dont know how to find my way around to get to rei and stuff yet, but that seems like a great option to send my bike home once i find one out there, i love rei.there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    • CommentAuthorNicole
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    when we went to portland, tyler made bike boxes out of regular old cardboard bike boxes but just cut them down to size so that they fit under size requirements better. you have to deflate yr tires and take off the wheels, saddle, handlebars and pedals but all of these things fit easily into the box with a little finagling. i guess our boxes were a tad over sized and they didnt charge us on the way out to portland (but they charged us coming back to bosotn). all in all it seemed to work out pretty well.
    •  
      CommentAuthorstickyfoot
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    I did the DIY route once, and promptly bought a flight case from Travis for future travels. Just buy me some beer or slip me a twenty and you won't have to worry about utility knives and duct tape.MC Chunky Ice in da howse
  8.  
    im gonna slip you something more then a twenty hot stuff...there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
  9.  
    anyone know what the san francisco forums name is? do they even have one?there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
  10.  
    hey richard,
    i just brought mine out on the plane, all i did was grab a bike box from the local bike shop and use that. i dont know about here, but out in LA they will give boxes to you for free. also, if you need bike contacts in SF, let me know. i make it up to those parts now and again.
  11.  
    sweet, i have a few people to chill with but they are not too bike savvy and i do want a good cycling impression of the city...there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
  12.  
    email me here iamjackswastedyouth@hotmail.com let me know when you are going and ill call up my buddies! i have to return the out of town bike love :)
  13.  
    I have one of the boxes like Rob. I've flown with it 7 or 8 times, never had a real problem.

    Mine is home-made, but just like the freight ones. After making it, buying up all of the materials, I think that Travis's price is very reasonable. If you want to fly your bike at all, get one. It will save you some money in the long run, and as Rob has demonstrated, it acts as a beer generator if you loan it out.
  14.  
    im gonna get one when i return, unless i can pick one up in san francisco this weekend. (probably not)

    just seems like something good to have around.

    (holla back nick!!!!!)there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
  15.  
    hey rob, whats up with building small boxes? i fly back to LA tomorrow and id be stoked if i didnt hvae to pay again.
    •  
      CommentAuthorMr. Shelby
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    i talked to travis about getting one last year, then all of a sudden he stopped responding to me. all i know is that he makes them when he gets enough orders, or once every other month or something like that.
    • CommentAuthorcindierock
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    endurancenirvana:If you have time and don't want to deal with putting it together, go to REI. They'll take it apart, box it, ship it, and put it together at any of their stores. I went Boston to SFO and then back from Eugene, OR and it worked beautifully.

    They charge $25 plus shipping. Ended up being about $65 each way. Beautiful part is that you don't have to deal with it at the airport, no tools needed, no packing materials.


    Any REI? Any bike?
  16.  
    i checked into this, the rei thing, and yes and yes!

    i plan on sending my bike home this way. so much easierthere ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    •  
      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    when greg and i flew out to chicago we used regular-sized bike boxes. it cost $85 each way for each of us. so lame. so if you can get around $170 in bike-carting fees, it's so worth it. don't forget your drop-out protectors!
  17.  
    drop out protectors?there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    • CommentAuthorMacDonald
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    richardmylove:im gonna get one when i return, unless i can pick one up in san francisco this weekend. (probably not)

    just seems like something good to have around.

    (holla back nick!!!!!)


    When are you going to be in SF. I'm heading back to Boston from sf on the 17th. But if you get here before then I can get you REI/ Post office if you go that rout.

    also www.sffixed.com
  18.  
    im headin there this thursday, i got a bike box to bring it out there in thanks to rob!
    thanks man!there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    • CommentAuthorMacDonald
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    Awesome. You will have a good time, SF has not disappointed me once in 10 months.
  19.  
    i know, this is a test to see if i should move out there. seems like an awesome place to chill out as far as i have heard.there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    • CommentAuthorMacDonald
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    It is... I have really fallen in love with this city in the past 10 months
    Too many positives to list, but its a really wonderful city
  20.  
    thats just what i want to hear! i mean the weather alone is a major draw...there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    •  
      CommentAuthorMorgie
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    When flying domestically I find it all depends on the airline and the person checking you in... I have a hardcase that unfortunately my cousin in Ottawa has at the moment and I've flown with in too and from Texas a couple of times. In 6 flights (3 roud trips) I've only been hit with a fee once, and luckily they only hit me with a overweight baggage fee of $25, and not a sporting goods fee of $75-100... I've also flown with surfboards before and I can tell you that bikes are actually much easier to get on a plane safely and cheaply, surfboards are a $75 fee each way and they always charge it (no getting lucky) and there is about a %40 chance of it arriving seriously damaged.
    • CommentAuthorMacDonald
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    Weather is amazing... you can almost never go wrong with the t-shirt and a hooded sweatshirt combo.

    What part of the city are you staying in?
  21.  
    the mission area. but i hope to see most of the city if possiblethere ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    •  
      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    richardmylove:drop out protectors?


    If there's nothing in the frame or fork where the wheel hub should be, it can easily be smooshed while the box is being thrown around. A long threaded bolt, with 3 nuts to set the spacing, or an old hub works well. A bike shop might also have some plastic dropout protectors from boxed bikes.Troglodytarum is latin for troll
  22.  
    thanks for that tip!
    im glad someone picked up on that questionthere ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    • CommentAuthorMacDonald
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    The mission is the best.

    Make sure to get a burrito at Pancho Villa.
  23.  
    will do!there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    •  
      CommentAuthorstickyfoot
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    Ok, so if you want to fly ghetto and you're prepared to take your bike completely apart, this is your recipe for free flying:

    Cardboard bike box (free from some shops...try not to pay for one!)
    Cardboard wheel box (free also)
    Frame savers (plastic doodads that wedge in your fork and dropouts...get these for free from a bike shop too)
    Utility knife
    Duct tape
    Some kind of padding (I bought bubble wrap, but you could probably also just use some clothes)
    Tools to disassemble your bike
    A few ziplock bags, if you so desire
    A sharpie

    1. Take your bike apart, except for the bottom bracket. It's mainly essential to get the fork out and cranks off. Keep the messy bits like headset parts and the chain in ziplock bags.
    2. Open the bike box along all glued seams so that it lies flat. Note: pay attention to how the box was assembled in the first place. You'll be reconstructing it using similar principles, only with a smaller, funkier shape.
    3. Note the hinge in the cardboard where the two large sides meet a smaller rectangle between. We'll call this smaller rectangle the hinge piece. Lay your frame along one side of the hinge piece and trace around it. Be sure to make it so you have plenty of cardboard (4-5 inches worth) on the outside of this line, with the exception of the hinge side. Flip your frame over so that you're tracing the mirror image of what you just traced, only on the other side of the hinge piece. You're aiming for a mirror image of your bike frame, but with a rectangular hinge of cardboard between the frame shapes. Again, similar in concept to how the box itself was assembled. (This will be easier to picture when you have the box in front of you.)
    4. Using a straight edge, draw another line that's slightly larger than the exact frame shape you just traced. This is to accommodate for padding, and to simplify the shape so you're not cutting out the exact shape of your head tube and whatnot. Basically, simplify the shape so it's easier to make into a 3D box that your frame can fit inside. A parallelogram-ish shape works well.
    5. Next, draw some tabs that will become the top, bottom and sides of the box. Draw 4-5 inch lines that go perpendicular to each edge of your parallelogram. Then connect those lines with another line, so you have a long rectangle jutting off the side of each edge. Picture those diagrams of paper houses and stuff. That's what you're aiming for.
    6. Cut out along the outside edge of all the lines, making sure you don't cut where you should be folding.
    7. Score along the fold lines and put the box together! Reinforce all the seams with duct tape, but leave one end open so you can get stuff in and out. Also, it might be a good idea to cut a handle into it, or fashion some kind of strap. I just cut a hole roughly where the top tube was so that I could reach in and use the frame itself as a handle.
    8. Wrap all parts in your padding and put inside the box carefully. Deflate the tires and put the wheels in the wheel box. Reinforce the spot in the wheel box where the axles meet the cardboard. I just used tape, but it wouldn't hurt to add a piece of cardboard on the inside too.
    9. Divvy up your parts and tools between the boxes, to spread the weight evenly. Seal up both boxes with duct tape when you're done. (The TSA will open these boxes, so be prepared for that. They'll reseal them with duct tape when they're done making sure that your bike is not a pipe bomb.)

    So, yeah, complicated but cheap. It's hard to describe without a diagram. Maybe somebody can draw something up? Hit me up if you have any questions.

    robMC Chunky Ice in da howse
  24.  
    ill stick with that freight bag man, sounds way easier.there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
  25.  
    maybe this thing can be assembled with some canvas?
    i guess i need to do itthere ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    •  
      CommentAuthorstickyfoot
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    richardmylove:ill stick with that freight bag man, sounds way easier.


    Exactly. But it might help Shannon get back to LA without paying another fee.MC Chunky Ice in da howse
  26.  
    right on!there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    • CommentAuthorkanst
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    So I was bored at work, he is a half assed attemp at illustrating what Stickyfoot was trying to describe:



    I was going to use AutoCAD to do it but unfortunately that program isnt standard on my work laptop
    •  
      CommentAuthoraarn
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    DHL is fucking sweet for shipping bikes. I sent one bike to minneapolis from boston with UPS and it cost me $60 (including $900 insurance), then I sent two bikes back DHL and it cost me $38 for both, together, and I had like $1200 insurance on the pair.

    And if you are shipping, MAKE SURE TO USE THE PLASTIC PROTECTORS FOR FORK DROPOUTS. I know this was mentioned, but I just wanted to emphasize it.(moscow)
    •  
      CommentAuthorstickyfoot
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    Yes, Kanst! Except you really don't need that much padding around the frame. Maybe an inch. Also, it looks like the short side of the box would meet the long side. But that's essentially the idea.MC Chunky Ice in da howse
  27.  
    that is so awesome!there ain't no magic in the breakdown baby
    • CommentAuthorkanst
    • CommentTimeNov 26th 2007
     
    stickyfoot:Yes, Kanst! Except you really don't need that much padding around the frame. Maybe an inch. Also, it looks like the short side of the box would meet the long side. But that's essentially the idea.


    Yup I did screw that part up, basically take the bottom half and flip it 180 degrees so the short sides meet up.