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      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2012
     
    Reminder - DON'T BRING GLASS BEER/DRINK BOTTLES TO DA WEASEL!

    From the reg page: "BEER! The awesome folks at White Barn Farm have kindly requested that guests refrain from bringing bottled beer due to bottle caps being littered all over the property in past years and the potential for breakage. We know that your favorite Belgian beers don't come in cans or kegs, so now might be the perfect time to explore the wide array of quality canned beers (that don't taste like lemons and hobo urine). BEER!"
  1.  
    ^Just came to post the same message: "Wicked friendly reminder: No bottles at @DahWeasel Saturday. Brings cans, bring Flabongos, shit...bring A KEG, but don't bring bottles." - Thom Parsons
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      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2012
     
    In case you don't know what a Flabongo is...read this.
  2.  
    That guy in the mickey mouse head is going to haunt my dreamsNaaaah, too uncool for the #messlyfe. I just like to hang out in loading docks and pretend to talk on my radio so that people will like me. - Mfratt
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      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    If there's any way you're a cyclocross racer and managed to miss the outrage that came out of the 'cross summit USAC hosted this weekend along with the recent announcements from the UCI...

    The UCI are now making all national federations enforce a long-standing rule that states ANYONE with a UCI license is forbidden from racing events not sanctioned by the UCI or the national federation. This means even the elite scrubs aren't allowed to do things like 100 miler mtb races, the 24 hour races, EFTA races, etc. It seems to have less impact on road racing, as most road races (Mike Norton productions notwithstanding) are under USAC. Local pros are understandably frustrated, saying it's a financial hit to cut a number of races from their calender as well as a disservice to their sponsors and limits their ability to interact with amateurs and help to inspire and grow the sport.

    Also, hand-ups are now officially forbidden in sanctioned cyclocross races. Taking a hand-up of any kind (beer, cupcake, waffles, rubber chicken) is grounds for DQ, taking a dollar hand-up is grounds for DQ + $50 fine. They say that this is because the insurance companies got wind of it (including pictures of underage juniors taking beer hand-ups) and they want to avoid liability. That's understandable to me but then I don't understand why a dollar hand-up carries a steeper punishment than a beer hand-up.
    • CommentAuthorBAUMANN
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013 edited
     
    geez, thats really too bad, i didnt realize that the UCI was MAKING national federations enforce the rule...my understanding up to this point was that it was a rule that USAC could CHOOSE whether or not they wanted to enforce...and while we all assumed (because USAC is a tool) they probably WOULD enforce it (at least before a huge backlash), I never expected this to ACTUALLY happen...

    makes me happy to not be at the UCI level, but at the same time really really bummed for the reasons you stated above:

    "Local pros are understandably frustrated, saying it's a financial hit to cut a number of races from their calender as well as a disservice to their sponsors and limits their ability to interact with amateurs and help to inspire and grow the sport."

    That last bit there should be part of the operational ethos of USAC, instead it seems to be just the opposite.

    AS FOR HAND UPS...

    I thought a hand up was always grounds for DQ at a USAC race? Dollar bill handups were safe I guess (not food or drink) but now DQ + a FINE?! THAT, is seriously stupid.

    I really hope this rule gets canned sooner rather than later...I see ZERO benefit here for ANYONE actually riding a bike.RIDE METAL
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      CommentAuthorseanile mick
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013 edited
     
    somebody turn the lights off on this place already.
    • CommentAuthorBAUMANN
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    ^ saw dat, very well said.RIDE METAL
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      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    Yawn.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
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      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013 edited
     
    I don't think hand-ups used to be a big enough "problem" that it warranted addressing sooner. I don't remember them really being a common thing until 2010. When it began to grow in prevalence they grouped beer and food hand-ups as "feeds", which there is a rule against (has to be a certain temperature, I think 70*F or above, can only occur in the pit and not on the first or last lap) and DQing some people for taking illegal feeds. Now they're specifically addressing the practice of giving hand-ups.

    & regarding USAC, yeah. UCI is making the national federations enforce it with a little leeway to make exceptions, but it doesn't sound like the exceptions generally apply to most races. I don't know if they could make ultra-endurance mtb races exempt, really the people they are negatively impacting the most are the World Cup mountain bikers like Chloe Woodruff and pro mtb/cx riders like Justin and Mo Bruno Roy.



    From local pro Justin Lindine:
    "So, I've been pretty irate about the whole UCI Rule 1.2.019. debacle that has come to the forefront in the past couple of days here, but here's the thing... I recognize that this is a complex and multi-layered issue and to simply break it down into a bunch of Twitter and Facebook rants does it a disservice. This is not strictly a USAC problem and I see the point of view that presents their position as being forced into a corner by the UCI...either enforce the rule or face global consequences.

    However, that being said I think it is paramount that we ask USAC, as our representatives to the UCI, on a federation level, to evaluate and ask "who does this rule benefit in the first place?" Does it not benefit every event to have the highest caliber of competitors possible? Is it not good for sponsors to have their professional riders be available, friendly and approachable advocates at these events? And doesn't it serve to foster a desire in young and developing riders to achieve a higher level of success in the sport? If all of these things are true, then who is this rule benefiting? If you can't make a case for it benefiting the largest number of license holders, or even the promoters who work so diligently to grow the sport, then it begins to look like some kind of strong-arming manipulation by the sports governing bodies...and that is not what sport should be about.

    I certainly don't want to see a situation where US professionals are discriminated against by the UCI based on USAC's failure to enforce the rules, as that would be a tragedy for those who have worked so hard to see the sport reach the levels it has in the past few years. However, I do think it is our right, as the members of a license-paying organization that is charged with being our representatives to the larger governing bodies (the UCI and the IOC), to ask for an evaluation of this rule based on it's merits and reasoning.

    I support USA Cycling, and am always proud to be a representative of them whenever I participate, but I would feel even more proud if there was an attempt on their part to foster discussion about this rule with the UCI.

    That's just my two-cents...sorry for the long winded diatribe."
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      CommentAuthor6kidz
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    I can see it being a hit to the culture of CX to cut out the partying/pass-up aspect, but ultimately you're there to race, right??"Dude's just smashing fructosenormativity, lay off."
    • CommentAuthorJimmyJ
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    yeah if it's a licensed race there should be stations for drinking/eating.
    no one should accept money while competing in an event. even a dollar.
    it the whole thing was for fun then what ever. but as some people pointed out there are cyclist who make a living competing at these things.
    i don't get the upset-ness about the hand-ups.

    the other thing sounds like a load of wank.
    • CommentAuthorBAUMANN
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013 edited
     
    6kidz:I can see it being a hit to the culture of CX to cut out the partying/pass-up aspect, but ultimately you're there to race, right??
    i dont think the culture will change at all, hand-ups have ALWAYS been grounds for a DQ and i dont see how they will be able to enforce it anymore than they already do unless they have 10x's the amount of officials roaming the course at every race (which wont happen).

    sure the beer gardens will be easy enough to patrol, but will they notice me giving jon barry cookie hand-ups at the top of the sterling run up? i think not.RIDE METAL
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      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    DQ: Do local pros actually make a bulk of their income from racing?Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    • CommentAuthorBAUMANN
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013 edited
     
    nerdo:DQ: Do local pros actually make a bulk of their income from racing?
    no way jose. they all have other jobs (someone feel free to prove me wrong).RIDE METAL
  3.  
    JimmyJ:
    it the whole thing was for fun then what ever. but as some people pointed out there are cyclist who make a living competing at these things.


    No one is making a living from racing. People can make a living coaching, but no one is making a living from podiuming at a cx race.YO NOT EVERYBODY GOES TO EAR SCHOOL OK
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      CommentAuthor6kidz
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    Cyclocross is OVER."Dude's just smashing fructosenormativity, lay off."
    • CommentAuthorJimmyJ
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    ^^i thought i read that there a pros who ride in these races??
    maybe i misinterpreted it.

    regardless, as events get bigger and start to be run more professionally certain responsibilities come along.
    and if you're entering a race where you pay money and you have to have a license i think there's a reasonable expectation that there is a certain level of professionalism.

    when i did a few cx races back home i loved the beer. and i loved giving it. but when the event became the state championship (the guy who won the first series became defacto national champ and went to the worlds) they had to change how things were being run.
    didn't stop it being fun.
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      CommentAuthor6kidz
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    Wont you think of the children??"Dude's just smashing fructosenormativity, lay off."
    • CommentAuthorBAUMANN
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    most cx races do not have a "party" atmosphere...people heckle at every race, sure, but there are only a handful of races where beer handups make an appearance.RIDE METAL
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      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013 edited
     
    banana truffles:
    JimmyJ:
    it the whole thing was for fun then what ever. but as some people pointed out there are cyclist who make a living competing at these things.


    No one is making a living from racing. People can make a living coaching, but no one is making a living from podiuming at a cx race.

    Some of the mountain bikers who this is affecting do make a living from podiuming and taking away their ability to race non-USAC or UCI events really does impact them. If you read the Chloe Woodruff article, she moved AZ for a month to prepare for the Whiskey 50, an unsanctioned race that pays out $6500 to BOTH the men and women's winner. Now she has to choose between races like that (unsanctioned mtb races tend to have good payouts and more equality of prizes) and racing World Cups.

    Local pros like Lindine, Mo, Myerson, McNicholas, etc all work in some capacity other than racing but also make some decent money on racing. McNicholas once told me what he makes during the road season and it's an appreciable amount. Especially if you're trying to make it as a bike racer, that supplemental income to help with travel and to cover time off from your day job is huge. Again, I'm not seeing this hitting the roadies too hard but it's going to have a huge impact on high level mountain bikers.

    This also means that I can't technically do the 24 Hours of Great Glen or any EFTA races and maintain my UCI license for cyclocross without risking potential fines and suspension, this rule applies to me. The fact that it includes elite-level amateurs is pretty absurd. I certainly am not in it for the prize money but I don't want to have to give up races I love because they aren't sanctioned by USAC. Reuter (promoter of Night Weasels, Ice Weasels, and the upcoming mtb race Gnar Weasels) has a UCI license and opted to put his mtb race on the EFTA calender instead of going with USAC sanctioning before this all came out. Now he technically isn't even allowed to race his own bike race!
    • CommentAuthorJimmyJ
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2013
     
    just to be clear.
    i understand the need to be somewhat strict when it comes to racers accepting money mid-race.
    i think the license rule thing seems like a big dick swinging thing and do not like it.

    it sucks if it means people can't enjoy riding as much as they do.
  4.  
    • CommentAuthortristan
    • CommentTimeApr 9th 2013
     
    Fwiw, USAC has stated that they are working with the UCI to address concerns raised by the rule clarifications.ascott430 - "Was going to build it up into a fixed gear until I realized I'd rather spend money and time on mountain bikes."
  5.  
    There is a meeting with the Gloucester town committee and Paul Boudreau (race planner) tomorrow to determine if gp gloucester will be allowed to happen this year.

    Here is some info about what is going on : http://www.cxmagazine.com/city-gloucester-open-letter-promoter-paul-boudreau and http://goodmorninggloucester.wordpress.com/2013/07/25/from-paul-boudreau-of-gran-prix-gloucester/

    Essentially, some people in town thought that the race caused too much damage and the promoters didn't clean up enough. However, they did.

    Please come to Stage Fort Park in Gloucester at *8 am* YES I KNOW THIS IS EARLY AS HELL, however, SAVE GLOUSTAH!YO NOT EVERYBODY GOES TO EAR SCHOOL OK
  6.  
    And then what? Is there to be chanting? Sign holdage? Meeting interruption? Wheelies? Popular votes?i mean that looks like a 10 cat bag, easy
  7.  
    Nope, it is a meeting where the committee and the race organizers talk. We show up to stand silently in support.YO NOT EVERYBODY GOES TO EAR SCHOOL OK
  8.  
    standing silently in support is a terribly uncyclocross-y way to do it. heckle mercilessly instead.
    • CommentAuthorJimmyJ
    • CommentTimeJul 26th 2013
     
    cow bells and beer-ups for the speakers
  9.  
    What good cross races will be on sundays this year?

    who wants to drive me to them?Naaaah, too uncool for the #messlyfe. I just like to hang out in loading docks and pretend to talk on my radio so that people will like me. - Mfratt
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      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeJul 31st 2013
     
    Look at bikereg.com under "Cyclocross" and then "New England" to see the races as they are listed and to register for the ones you want to do. Also, the dates of the NEPCX/Shimano Series and the Verge Series were just announced here. Not sure which weekend day they usually are but Suckerbrook, Canton, the MRC race in Lancaster (blanking on the name), and Ice Weasels are great local grassroots races (as opposed to the big UCI weekends). Also, there are two Wednesday night races that are during Holy Week, it's another MRC race and the Night Weasels race. If you have Wednesday evenings free you should go to those, they're a lot of fun.