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  1.  
    ugh i cant' believe i didn't get Pyrrhus, that was my name one of my 5 years of Latin classDFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeOct 26th 2018 edited
     
    #2 is Pecorino, and I did get #4 and #6. So maybe I'm not as afraid of this league as I thought.

    I'm ashamed to have no clue on #1. But the only novel by Willa Cather I've read is My Antonia, and I doubt Antonia is the noun in question.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
  2.  
    Yep, Pecorino Romano. I'm still kicking myself over that one. And while I'm pretty certain I had never heard that Ariana Grande track before that day, I've heard it repeatedly since.

    I'm somewhat ashamed to admit I never bothered to look up the Cather or Bowen titles. It was a long time ago, but I read a few Mann novels, including the novela in question (tbh, meh?) Did read the Agee one, that's mostly what got it for me (AFAIK there are only three Agee books?)
    •  
      CommentAuthora_lion
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2018
     
    dq - do i want to spend $200ish on a bow and arrows or will i get bored quickly and have it turn into a waste of money? would biking to the range and labeling things on strava as a biathlon be enough to keep me going? =PThat may be my favorite DQ of all time - nerdo
    •  
      CommentAuthorNandy
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2018
     
    Can you rent them there?"life is hard, cats are soft." - surprisefries
    •  
      CommentAuthora_lion
    • CommentTimeOct 27th 2018
     
    Nah, it's a new part of the park district I work for, and 95% off the time it's unmanned/byo-bow. Went to a pumpkin shooting event there today and they had bows, but that's the only event on the calendar right now.That may be my favorite DQ of all time - nerdo
    •  
      CommentAuthorkossmonaut
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2018
     
    tell work you need one, and write it off as a work expense. constant deer attacks on the ride home ;)
    •  
      CommentAuthorNandy
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2018
     
    Also make it part of your daily wardrobe and tell people you're on your way to the range when they ask. Get a sweet-ass quiver and shit. Maybe start some kind of club to keep going?"life is hard, cats are soft." - surprisefries
    •  
      CommentAuthora_lion
    • CommentTimeOct 28th 2018
     
    i bet a club goes better if you...know anyone =/ suppose i could start a meetup!
    daily wardrobe - pockets full of chapstick, work coat burnt on the butt cuz i leaned against a propane heater a bit too long, and a bow. sure!That may be my favorite DQ of all time - nerdo
  3.  
    You definitely need a bow and arrow. Reminds me I was planning to get one for my daughter for... Christmas I guess? Admittedly Hanukkah seems like a more appropriate weapon holiday.
  4.  
    PS: Is it wrong that when I read Nandy's comment I misinterpreted it as a suggestion to get a club (the weapon) rather than a bow and arrow? Or maybe it just explains why I'm not a member of any social clubs.
    •  
      CommentAuthora_lion
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    i think it was advice to get The Club to lock your steering wheel! very useful!

    do you celebrate both holidays? sounds expensive!That may be my favorite DQ of all time - nerdo
  5.  
    My kids are Jewish, so yeah, both holidays (my mother, and maybe my father, are Catholic). Thankfully Hanukkah's not a very expensive holiday. Mostly small presents.
    •  
      CommentAuthora_lion
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    as someone who only did hanukkah as a kid (don't do much of anything now) I NOTICEDThat may be my favorite DQ of all time - nerdo
  6.  
    haha

    this was all excellent advice

    get a bow, it's funDFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  7.  
    If anyone remains curious the only questions one of you didn't get was 1. Death (Death Comes for the Archbishop, Death in Venice, A Death in the Family, and... I can't remember the last one). 3. Dude Perfect. Fair to say that one was a YEKIOYD.
    •  
      CommentAuthorNandy
    • CommentTimeOct 29th 2018
     
    damn, both holidays sound like where it's at, unless their birthdays are also around the same time then presents just get spread around a little."life is hard, cats are soft." - surprisefries
  8.  
    Sort of... most years it works out well, but I feel a little bad for Hanukkah when it coincides with Christmas - hard to compete, easy to get lost in the mix. On the other hand my relatives do enjoy latkes.

    Thankfully they're both summer birthdays so that's not an issue.
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2018
     
    Um, enough with holiday talk. I've got the trivia bug and need more questions. :)Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    •  
      CommentAuthorStinky Cheez
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2018 edited
     
    1. Who began his acceptance speech after winning the Best Actor Oscar at the Academy Awards ceremony in 1970, "If I'd have known that, I'd have put that patch on 35 years earlier," having won the award for the first time for his 139th film?

    2. "Brummie" is a term used for a person from what city, as well as the name for a local dialect?

    3. What is the last name shared by the French-Italian astronomer who studied the division in Saturn's ring system that now bears his name, and the French-born American fashion designer largely responsible for what became known as the "Jackie Look"?

    4. Encaustic painting is most often used as the name of an artistic technique where pigments are mixed with what medium before being applied to the rigid support material (usually wood)?

    5. U.S. Senator John Sherman Cooper, U.S. Rep. Hale Boggs, U.S. Rep. Gerald R. Ford, and former CIA Director Allen Dulles were among a group of seven men who, beginning in late 1963, were collectively known most commonly by what name?

    6. With only one of its nine letters a vowel, what word—sometimes the name for a section of a CV/resume (or perhaps, probably more often, a topic of discussion in a job interview)—is widely considered the longest word in the English language containing only one vowel?

    -------

    (All but #3 were questions on one of the GDs from two seasons ago, the original #3 had a picture associated with it, so for simplicity's sake I replaced it with another science question from the same season).

    PS: I don't know whether I should post this, but in the off-seasons LL runs one day quizzes and minileagues with subjects and questions developed and written by members. I wrote a really difficult Massachusetts focused one day quiz a few off seasons back. Only one person got all of the questions right (one days feature 12 questions instead of 6). Downside is the question quality of one days does vary.
    • CommentAuthorryan t
    • CommentTimeOct 30th 2018
     
    1. John Wayne
    •  
      CommentAuthora_lion
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2018
     
    i've got NOTHING =(That may be my favorite DQ of all time - nerdo
    •  
      CommentAuthorStinky Cheez
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2018 edited
     
    Yes on Wayne for 1.

    ETA: This one was one of those rare days where I took a little extra time - spent it looking at nine blank lines on a piece of paper, and used logic to figure out a word that had 9 letters and only one vowel, and then it all made sense.
  9.  
    a_lion:i've got NOTHING =(
    DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthorStinky Cheez
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2018 edited
     
    I don't think I made myself very popular with this one day. I feel like a lot of MA trivia is widely known, so I set out to write something a little more difficult. Needless to say I accomplished the latter:

    1. The sport now known by this name was originally dubbed Mintonette by its inventor, Holyoke Y.M.C.A. physical director William G. Morgan, in 1895. Developed to be a less strenuous team sport than basketball, the signature scoring method practiced today was not introduced until 1916. The sport debuted at the Olympics in 1964.

    2. While a Veterans War Memorial Tower was proposed for several locations in the Boston area as early as 1918, the final structure, built out of Quincy granite, was instead constructed at this location between 1931-1932. (There was a photograph that went along with this, of a stone tower above a treeline with an ornamental light on top, large expanse of sky as if on top of a hill).

    3. The state legislature is formally known by this name, which originated during the provincial era when the legislature also played a role in another branch of government.

    4. Born in Exeter, NH, this sculptor lived most of his life in Concord, Massachusetts, summering at his similarly-named estate and studio in Stockbridge. While his most prominent monumental scale design (1911-1922) is centrally located in the nation's capital, his best known pieces in the Commonwealth are at the North Bridge in Concord (1871-1875) and in Harvard Yard (1883-1884).

    5. Sasumuneash is the Wômpanâak name for this berry, the harvest of which they marked with a yearly celebration.

    6. Brook Farm was a well-known transcendentalist utopian community, founded in the 1840s, and counted Nathaniel Hawthorne amongst its members. It failed within a few years of its founding. Brook Farm was not the only 1840s transcendentalist community in Massachusetts with a connection to a famous author. Another was co-founded by Louisa May Alcott's father Bronson. She described her childhood living in the community, near Concord, in Transcendental Wild Oats. A letter she excerpted read "Ordinary secular farming is not our object… (i)t is intended to adorn the pastures with orchards, and to supercede the labor of cattle by the spade and the pruning-knife." Like Brook Farm it failed within a short time. Name the community.

    7. Also known as The Worcester Whirlwind and The Black Cyclone, Marshall W. Taylor, the first African-American to win a World Championship in any sport other than boxing (1899 One Mile Track Cycling), is better known by this one word nickname which he allegedly picked up because of the military-style uniforms he wore when working as a trick-cyclist as a teen. The city of Worcester sports a statue of Taylor and renamed a centrally located street after him. An Indiana native, Taylor's name also graces a Velodrome in Indianapolis.

    8. The former F.A. Kennedy Steam Bakery of Cambridge is remembered today for originating mass production of a baked treat named after a nearby city. Name that baked good.

    9. The fictional Massachusetts town of Arkham first appeared in this author's 1920 short story The Picture in the House. The author referenced the name Arkham in twelve other works, including a short story that went on to inspire the 1985 motion picture Re-Animator and its sequels.

    10. Elizabeth Freeman, one of the plaintiffs in the 1781 case of Brom & Bett v. Ashley, was the first woman in Massachusetts to successfully sue for what?

    11. In 1976, after redistricting threatened to take away their state house districts and combine them into one district with residents of another county, residents of two counties threatened to secede from the Commonwealth. Several states expressing interest in taking them in. Name either one of the two counties.

    12. The following photograph depicts the common of the Swift River Valley town of Dana circa 1900. If you were to visit the still accessible common today, you would find yourself where? (Accompanied by early 20th photograph depicting a rural town green with a church and several other buildings)
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2018
     
    Is #2 Cassini? And #4 is definitely Wax. #6 is "strengths."

    Stinky Cheez:1. Who began his acceptance speech after winning the Best Actor Oscar at the Academy Awards ceremony in 1970, "If I'd have known that, I'd have put that patch on 35 years earlier," having won the award for the first time for his 139th film?

    2. "Brummie" is a term used for a person from what city, as well as the name for a local dialect?

    3. What is the last name shared by the French-Italian astronomer who studied the division in Saturn's ring system that now bears his name, and the French-born American fashion designer largely responsible for what became known as the "Jackie Look"?

    4. Encaustic painting is most often used as the name of an artistic technique where pigments are mixed with what medium before being applied to the rigid support material (usually wood)?

    5. U.S. Senator John Sherman Cooper, U.S. Rep. Hale Boggs, U.S. Rep. Gerald R. Ford, and former CIA Director Allen Dulles were among a group of seven men who, beginning in late 1963, were collectively known most commonly by what name?

    6. With only one of its nine letters a vowel, what word—sometimes the name for a section of a CV/resume (or perhaps, probably more often, a topic of discussion in a job interview)—is widely considered the longest word in the English language containing only one vowel?

    -------

    (All but #3 were questions on one of the GDs from two seasons ago, the original #3 had a picture associated with it, so for simplicity's sake I replaced it with another science question from the same season).

    PS: I don't know whether I should post this, but in the off-seasons LL runs one day quizzes and minileagues with subjects and questions developed and written by members. I wrote a really difficult Massachusetts focused one day quiz a few off seasons back. Only one person got all of the questions right (one days feature 12 questions instead of 6). Downside is the question quality of one days does vary.
    Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
  10.  
    Yes to all three.
  11.  
    (MA questions)
    1. Team Handball?
    5. Cranberries?
    7. Major
    8. Boston cream pie?DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2018
     
    1. Basketball
    2. Beacon Hill
    3. (No clue)
    4. (I feel like I should know this but I don't)
    5. Cranberry
    6. Wild Oats Farm?? (Wild stab)
    7. Major Taylor (yay, fixed gear content!!)
    8. Boston Cream Pie
    9. HP Lovecraft
    10. Freedom from slavery? (another wild stab)
    11. Middlesex and Suffolk?
    12. In the Quabbin Reservoir

    Stinky Cheez:I don't think I made myself very popular with this one day. I feel like a lot of MA trivia is widely known, so I set out to write something a little more difficult. Needless to say I accomplished the latter:

    1. The sport now known by this name was originally dubbed Mintonette by its inventor, Holyoke Y.M.C.A. physical director William G. Morgan, in 1895. Developed to be a less strenuous team sport than basketball, the signature scoring method practiced today was not introduced until 1916. The sport debuted at the Olympics in 1964.

    2. While a Veterans War Memorial Tower was proposed for several locations in the Boston area as early as 1918, the final structure, built out of Quincy granite, was instead constructed at this location between 1931-1932. (There was a photograph that went along with this, of a stone tower above a treeline with an ornamental light on top, large expanse of sky as if on top of a hill).

    3. The state legislature is formally known by this name, which originated during the provincial era when the legislature also played a role in another branch of government.

    4. Born in Exeter, NH, this sculptor lived most of his life in Concord, Massachusetts, summering at his similarly-named estate and studio in Stockbridge. While his most prominent monumental scale design (1911-1922) is centrally located in the nation's capital, his best known pieces in the Commonwealth are at the North Bridge in Concord (1871-1875) and in Harvard Yard (1883-1884).

    5. Sasumuneash is the Wômpanâak name for this berry, the harvest of which they marked with a yearly celebration.

    6. Brook Farm was a well-known transcendentalist utopian community, founded in the 1840s, and counted Nathaniel Hawthorne amongst its members. It failed within a few years of its founding. Brook Farm was not the only 1840s transcendentalist community in Massachusetts with a connection to a famous author. Another was co-founded by Louisa May Alcott's father Bronson. She described her childhood living in the community, near Concord, in Transcendental Wild Oats. A letter she excerpted read "Ordinary secular farming is not our object… (i)t is intended to adorn the pastures with orchards, and to supercede the labor of cattle by the spade and the pruning-knife." Like Brook Farm it failed within a short time. Name the community.

    7. Also known as The Worcester Whirlwind and The Black Cyclone, Marshall W. Taylor, the first African-American to win a World Championship in any sport other than boxing (1899 One Mile Track Cycling), is better known by this one word nickname which he allegedly picked up because of the military-style uniforms he wore when working as a trick-cyclist as a teen. The city of Worcester sports a statue of Taylor and renamed a centrally located street after him. An Indiana native, Taylor's name also graces a Velodrome in Indianapolis.

    8. The former F.A. Kennedy Steam Bakery of Cambridge is remembered today for originating mass production of a baked treat named after a nearby city. Name that baked good.

    9. The fictional Massachusetts town of Arkham first appeared in this author's 1920 short story The Picture in the House. The author referenced the name Arkham in twelve other works, including a short story that went on to inspire the 1985 motion picture Re-Animator and its sequels.

    10. Elizabeth Freeman, one of the plaintiffs in the 1781 case of Brom & Bett v. Ashley, was the first woman in Massachusetts to successfully sue for what?

    11. In 1976, after redistricting threatened to take away their state house districts and combine them into one district with residents of another county, residents of two counties threatened to secede from the Commonwealth. Several states expressing interest in taking them in. Name either one of the two counties.

    12. The following photograph depicts the common of the Swift River Valley town of Dana circa 1900. If you were to visit the still accessible common today, you would find yourself where? (Accompanied by early 20th photograph depicting a rural town green with a church and several other buildings)
    Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    •  
      CommentAuthorStinky Cheez
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2018 edited
     
    Yes to Cranberries, Major, HP Lovecraft, Freedom from Slavery, and Quabbin! With One Days (1ds) players select five responses to "money" and if they get it right they get 15 points plus a point for every percentage point of participants who got it wrong. If Nerdo had played for real he would've done really well.

    I didn't really intend for #1 to be a trick question, but it certainly feels like one, with western MA and YMCA in the question. The differences are, Naismith invented basketball, and basketball is credited to Springfield.

    I have to admit I was really surprised by people going with Boston Creme Pie, you'd think that would have occurred to me as a alternative answer, but it didn't.

    One problem I ran into, there was a major loss of data at LL's site host after this 1ds ran, and while Thorsten did his best to recreate everything from back-up, there was information lost - one thing I'm not certain about is whether there was a photo that went along with #11 - I know I tracked down a few images related to the succession movement (there was a flag), but can't remember for sure if I used one.

    There was once a Boston minileague, but it was shortly before I joined. Bummer because I would've done pretty well.
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2018
     
    Woohoo! The local version was fun! I feel pretty dumb for reading right over the Holyoke clue in #1. But I guess this thread is called "Dumb Questions" so maybe I shouldn't feel so bad. :)Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    •  
      CommentAuthorStinky Cheez
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2018 edited
     
    For anyone curious, these were the other answers (I wish all forums had spoiler tags, so handy to be able to cover text until it's moused over)

    1. Volleyball (62% correct)

    2. Mount Greylock (12% correct - I half-expected people might game theory their way into this, how could I not have a question about the state's highest point?)

    3. General Court (27% correct)

    4. Daniel Chester French (19% correct - DC work referenced was the Lincoln Memorial - I imagine a fair # of people went with St Gaudens)

    5. Cranberry (81% correct)

    6. Fruitlands (13% correct - keep meaning to visit but have never actually been)

    7. Major (12% correct)

    8. Fig Newton (27% correct)

    9. HP Lovecraft (55% correct)

    10. Freedom/Emancipation (18% correct - I thought more people would pick up on the split btwn case name and plaintiff's name, and the fact her surname was Freeman)

    11. Dukes/Nantucket (19% correct - when I was a kid my mother had a kite with the succession flag on it - it's disappearance remains a touchy subject)

    12. Quabbin Reservoir (25% correct - another question that I thought people might game theory their way into, tried to subtly imply the town no longer existed).

    --

    The woman who won is/was an assistant AG from the western suburbs. She also wins a lot of these things.

    I feel like I learned a lot about "smithing" a 1ds on this one. Did another, on Salads (note to self do not cook up one day ideas while baked) that I thought went better. Have a third coming up in early January, on Cannabis (note to self, remember prior notes to self).
  12.  
    Also, the answers to the two questions people didn't have guesses on.

    2. Birmingham (UK, I don't know what people from Birmingham AL call themselves).

    5. Warren Commission (1963 was the main clue).
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeNov 1st 2018
     
    I totally game theoried my way to the right answers on #10 and #12. Had I seen the picture for #2, I'd have made a different guess. And I'm very disappointed I didn't get #8, because of course.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    •  
      CommentAuthora_lion
    • CommentTimeNov 4th 2018
     
    dq: why'd we all die off again?

    also dq: why did i ever request a non scifi book from the library? reading something about how the economy changed from valuing stability to all temps all the time/valuing quick profits, and it's interesting but also HELP I NEED SPACE LASERS TO STAY AWAKEThat may be my favorite DQ of all time - nerdo
  13.  
    lol

    we as in the forum? Combination of people drifting away, moving away, etc. and then the huge spam problem that plagued the forum for...a year or so?DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  14.  
    On a brighter note, no need for melatonin.
    •  
      CommentAuthora_lion
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2018
     
    i mean, it was at least mildly chatty for a bit, and then 2 days of nothing and i was boooored. luckily now it's the week, and i will be busy as heck, including a full day of learning to farm with draft horses <3That may be my favorite DQ of all time - nerdo
  15.  
    I blame the trivia, it's usually a pretty safe bet and it can't speak for itself.
    • CommentAuthorryan t
    • CommentTimeNov 5th 2018
     
    Sorry people, I’ve been pretending I’m too cool for the internet. Will try to chat y’all up more often.

    Stinky Cheez:For anyone curious, these were the other answers (I wish all forums had spoiler tags, so handy to be able to cover text until it's moused over)

    1. Volleyball (62% correct)

    2. Mount Greylock (12% correct - I half-expected people might game theory their way into this, how could I not have a question about the state's highest point?)

    3. General Court (27% correct)

    4. Daniel Chester French (19% correct - DC work referenced was the Lincoln Memorial - I imagine a fair # of people went with St Gaudens)

    5. Cranberry (81% correct)

    6. Fruitlands (13% correct - keep meaning to visit but have never actually been)

    7. Major (12% correct)

    8. Fig Newton (27% correct)

    9. HP Lovecraft (55% correct)

    10. Freedom/Emancipation (18% correct - I thought more people would pick up on the split btwn case name and plaintiff's name, and the fact her surname was Freeman)

    11. Dukes/Nantucket (19% correct - when I was a kid my mother had a kite with the succession flag on it - it's disappearance remains a touchy subject)

    12. Quabbin Reservoir (25% correct - another question that I thought people might game theory their way into, tried to subtly imply the town no longer existed).

    --

    The woman who won is/was an assistant AG from the western suburbs. She also wins a lot of these things.

    I feel like I learned a lot about "smithing" a 1ds on this one. Did another, on Salads (note to self do not cook up one day ideas while baked) that I thought went better. Have a third coming up in early January, on Cannabis (note to self, remember prior notes to self).


    Several of these answers have connections to bike racing!

    2) There is a hill climb time trial at Mt Greylock

    5) The Myles Standish State Forest Race has huge cranberry bogs near by. One year I got lost in the bogs riding from the commuter rail to the race, and missed my start. They were nice and gave me my entry fee back =)

    6) There is a cyclocross race at Fruitlands. I was just there last weekend standing in the rain and helping people park their cars.

    7) Major Taylor!

    8) Quabbin Reservoir has a road race that is hard as fuck.
  16.  
    File under list-style questions I really wish they had dropped a name or two from. In this case particularly the second one listed. I stink at Games/Sports questions, why take away my advantage on one niche topic?

    1. Fabiana Luperini, Chris Froome, Jeannie Longo, Bradley Wiggins, Nicole Cooke, Fabian Cancellara, and Marianne Vos are all athletes who have achieved success in what sport?
    •  
      CommentAuthora_lion
    • CommentTimeNov 6th 2018 edited
     
    did froome actually get big enough non-bike people have heard of him? i'm actually only familiar with 4 of the 7 i think! (i know, i know, tour is 'the biggest sporting event in the world' but who the fuck even pays attention to cycling!?)That may be my favorite DQ of all time - nerdo
    • CommentAuthorryan t
    • CommentTimeNov 6th 2018
     
    I think I’m also 4 out of 7! But yeah I’ve heard it’s incredibly popular in France and Belgium, and people like know all the riders’ names, and their personal lives and shit. Probably also in Spain, Italy etc... But I wonder if the TDF is only the most IN PERSON watched sporting event in the world because people turn out to watch from the side of the road, and it lasts for 3 weeks. I can’t even find pirated Eurosport streams anymore. Has anyone ever seen it on ESPN or anything??
  17.  
    It's on Versus currently, I think (it's an NBC sports cable network).

    I miss the old Eurosport streams. Much harder to get now unless you have a VPN and can get around georestrictions.

    39% got that question correct (13% said skiing). Probably speaks to cycling still being a pretty obscure sport among Americans (there are players from all over the world, but LL is mostly Americans). I was going to hypothesize that it didn't help that none of the listed riders were Americans, but the get rate wasn't that much better for the following question:

    2. Bernard Hinault, Laurent Fignon, and Claudio Chiappucci were the Tour de France runners-up in 1986, 1989, and 1990. Who won the race all three of these years and remains today the only American cyclist to have won the Tour (officially at least)?

    42% Correct, 22% said you know who.

    Admittedly the latter question would likely be harder for people too young to remember it.
  18.  
    It used to be on OLN (Outdoor Life Network), which I guess is actually Canadian? To the extent that during the TdF I remember people calling it the Only Lance Network.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthora_lion
    • CommentTimeNov 6th 2018
     
    nothing going on currently, but i got shady streams this season from http://tiz-cycling.live/
    it has gotten much much harder, last year or soThat may be my favorite DQ of all time - nerdo
    •  
      CommentAuthora_lion
    • CommentTimeNov 6th 2018
     
    also, could be biggest in terms of number of people involved, between all the teams, the swannies, the DSes, bus drivers, cooks, tv people, motorcycle camera people, etc...That may be my favorite DQ of all time - nerdo
  19.  
    A neighbor's daughter works for the EF team, and when she first told me about it and that they were racing in Europe I was all "ah, that's cool" figuring maybe it was a Continental team. Didn't realize they're the successor to Garmin.
    •  
      CommentAuthora_lion
    • CommentTimeNov 6th 2018
     
    what used to be liquigas cannondale had been folded into it a few years before too i believeThat may be my favorite DQ of all time - nerdo
  20.  
    Wikipedia agrees, although they had changed their name to Cannondale prior to the merger.