Not signed in (Sign In)

Category Filter

Welcome, Guest

Want to take part in these discussions? Sign in if you have an account, or apply for one below

Vanilla 1.1.8 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

    • CommentAuthorjib12
    • CommentTimeJan 12th 2010
     
    Hey, i put together a single gear a couple of weeks ago, and im having a weird problem - one side of the rear wheel keeps slipping forward and jamming itself into the side of the back triangle. The crank side is being pulled forward by pedaling and slides that side of the wheel forward. The bolts had been tightened as much as i want them to be. Now the rear wheel still does have the full cassette on it, and its a real tight fit to get the wheel in the frame. should i try to go somewhere and get the cassette taken off, or is there another option? thanks
  1.  
    want < need. tighten them more.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
  2.  
    jib12:The bolts had been tightened as much as i want them to be.


    What conor said. Also the bolts could just not be getting any grip against the drop outs, in which case replacing the bolts might help.clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  3.  
    conor!:want < need. tighten them more.

    This. Epic is also right, try replacing the bolts, or changing from a Quick-release to a bolt-on skewer.

    Also, if you say "it's a real tight fit to get the wheel in the frame", does that mean that you have to physically dilate the rear triangle to get it in? Removing the cassette isn't going to help you in that respect, since the hub will still be the same size.

    for this issue, you have two options. A) get a hub with the correct spacing, or B) respace your frame. Sheldon Brown has a great article on how to do this yourself if you're a DIY kinda person, but if your frame is anything but steel, DO NOT ATTEMPT. You can also take it to a shop to have this done, but they'll probably tell you to get a different hub.

    billionth edit: are they horizontal (track) or semi-vertical (road) dropouts? If they're track drops, just pick up a pair of these and they'll keep your back axle in place if it kills them.Naaaah, too uncool for the #messlyfe. I just like to hang out in loading docks and pretend to talk on my radio so that people will like me. - Mfratt
    • CommentAuthorjib12
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2010
     
    When i say how tight i want them to be i mean that they're as tight as they could be but still be able to take off, but i'll try just crankin them all the way. and thanks for the frame info craigsinpictures, i might just get a new hub or wheel.
    also, could i try to sandpaper the frame where the bolts are connected to it to keep the bolts from sliding, because that area is starting to to strip
    thanks
  4.  
    I doubt sandpaper would work very well, just because it wouldn't do much to the frame unless you REALLY dug in. I think replacing your bolts would be a cheaper/easier option. Replacing the hub or wheel would be significantly more expensive, but probably the best option in the long run.Naaaah, too uncool for the #messlyfe. I just like to hang out in loading docks and pretend to talk on my radio so that people will like me. - Mfratt
    •  
      CommentAuthorBuckley!
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2010
     
    jib12:also, could i try to sandpaper the frame where the bolts are connected to it to keep the bolts from sliding

    NO
    That sort of shit is how your dropouts get corroded and then break. But, of course, if you're into that - knock yourself out.The kid's gotta learn that the game never lets up.
    • CommentAuthorjib12
    • CommentTimeJan 15th 2010
     
    ^
    ha alright, new bolts it is then