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    • CommentAuthorBAUMANN
    • CommentTimeFeb 22nd 2010 edited
     
    Can anyone point me to a good resource for this?
    I downloaded the excel thingy, spocalc, but I cant really get it to work...any advice?
    Thanks in advance!RIDE METAL
  1.  
    DT SWISS -> Click on spoke calculator.clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
    •  
      CommentAuthorxbobeahenx
    • CommentTimeFeb 22nd 2010 edited
     
    Edit: As I tried work my HTML skills, I was beaten to the punch! Yes, DT Swiss, use it.Except our own thoughts, there is nothing absolutely in our power.
  2.  
    ^haha! WIN FOR ME! But yeah... DT swiss has one of the better calculators out there. Granted I'm sure Kanye things TI has one of the best calculators of all time.clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
    •  
      CommentAuthorfmradio516
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2010
     
    i have some pretty good write ups on how to measure the hub and rims with a caliper and such. ill see if i can find em when i get home from work today.MUFFDVR
  3.  
    SpoCalc all the way, IMO.[all your base are belong to us]
    • CommentAuthortristan
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2010
     
    The dt swiss calculator hasn't failed me yet.ascott430 - "Was going to build it up into a fixed gear until I realized I'd rather spend money and time on mountain bikes."
  4.  
    ^Does the DT calculator have a database? (I'm assuming it does.) I don't have MS Excel any longer, so I can't really use SpocCalc at home. The thing I liked about SpoCalc was the older hubs / rims listed, and that I could create new entries and save them for later use. For me the data base is key, as the actual calculation of spoke length (once you have the measurements) is trivial.

    [:|][all your base are belong to us]
    • CommentAuthortristan
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2010
     
    The dt swiss calculator has a small static database. You cannot add new items to it, but you can enter in your own measurements.
    I used SpoCalc when I still had access to Excel, but the DT Swiss one has served my needs well enough to prevent me from coding up my own.ascott430 - "Was going to build it up into a fixed gear until I realized I'd rather spend money and time on mountain bikes."
    •  
      CommentAuthorxbobeahenx
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2010
     
    EPIC! Stratton:^haha! WIN FOR ME! But yeah... DT swiss has one of the better calculators out there. Granted I'm sure Kanye things TI has one of the best calculators of all time.


    TI83 is on my desk as I type this.Except our own thoughts, there is nothing absolutely in our power.
  5.  
    trizzt:The dt swiss calculator has a small static database. You cannot add new items to it, but you can enter in your own measurements.
    I used SpoCalc when I still had access to Excel, but the DT Swiss one has served my needs well enough to prevent me from coding up my own.

    Yeah, but if I can't save my measurements then I may as well do the calculations myself on mt TI 92+.

    [:|][all your base are belong to us]
  6.  
    robotbuilder:^Does the DT calculator have a database? (I'm assuming it does.) I don't have MS Excel any longer, so I can't really use SpocCalc at home. The thing I liked about SpoCalc was the older hubs / rims listed, and that I could create new entries and save them for later use. For me the data base is key, as the actual calculation of spoke length (once you have the measurements) is trivial.

    [:|]


    have you excel-less folks tried open office? it's an open source office suite that works pretty damn well. any drawbacks certainly pale in comparison to the price tag on MS office...
  7.  
    ^Yep. I like Open Office very much, annnd I just learned it supports macros, which SpoCalc uses.[all your base are belong to us]
    • CommentAuthortristan
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2010
     
    OpenOffice: sucks less than paying for Excel.

    The macros I've attempted to use haven't worked out so well, but I didn't write em so I'm not really sure if the borkeyness is due to OOo or the macro itself.

    I've found dt swiss' database to be good enough for most things, but I dont use many obscure hubs/rims in my builds. I really need to learn how to measure spoke length manually.ascott430 - "Was going to build it up into a fixed gear until I realized I'd rather spend money and time on mountain bikes."
  8.  
    trizzt:. . .I'm not really sure if the borkeyness is due to OOo or the macro itself. . .

    That sentence FTW.

    As for measurements, I usually screw up the ERD.[all your base are belong to us]
    •  
      CommentAuthortravisW
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2010 edited
     
    robotbuilder:
    trizzt:The dt swiss calculator has a small static database. You cannot add new items to it, but you can enter in your own measurements.
    I used SpoCalc when I still had access to Excel, but the DT Swiss one has served my needs well enough to prevent me from coding up my own.

    Yeah, but if I can't save my measurements then I may as well do the calculations myself on mt TI 92+.

    [:|]
    really, 92+?

    also, want office free? boom
    [edit: boom if you don't use one of those silly fruit computers.]boooyah
  9.  
    ^Yessir, it's like MATLAB on my lap. . . but something straight out of 2001 A Space Oddyssey. But 10 years ago, it was the jam!

    Hmm. . . tempted by the office 2010 beta.

    [:|][all your base are belong to us]
    •  
      CommentAuthortravisW
    • CommentTimeFeb 24th 2010
     
    ^i have matlab on both my computers, and use it all the time.boooyah
  10.  
    As do I.
    Are you aware of any open source programs like MATLAB?
    (I love it, but can't afford a licence for personal use.)

    The thing that most ties me to MATLAB are the hundreds of .m scripts I've written over the years for fitting functions, simulations, etc.[all your base are belong to us]
    • CommentAuthortristan
    • CommentTimeFeb 24th 2010
     
    Try out FreeMat? I used it a while back to write some heatmap drawing software, and it worked well enough, even if the documentation isn't all there. I'm not positive how compatible it is with Matlab's scripts though.ascott430 - "Was going to build it up into a fixed gear until I realized I'd rather spend money and time on mountain bikes."
  11.  
    ^Thanks for the tip, I'll try it out.[all your base are belong to us]
    •  
      CommentAuthorbrandonc
    • CommentTimeFeb 24th 2010
     
    robotbuilder:As do I.
    Are you aware of any open source programs like MATLAB?
    (I love it, but can't afford a licence for personal use.)

    The thing that most ties me to MATLAB are the hundreds of .m scripts I've written over the years for fitting functions, simulations, etc.

    for running old code, there aren't that many options. there's a very, very similar free language called octave. a lot of existing matlab code will just work; you'll probably need to make a few changes, though; some builtin matlab functions don't exist (csvread, uigetdir, uigetfile, etc.), but there are analogues you can look up. there's also no friendly GUI built in, but other people have written a few.

    for a larger package based on a different language, you might want to check out sage (http://sagemath.org/), which ties together a bunch of existing free math packages, or R if you're doing statistics/probability work: (http://www.r-project.org/).

    also, just to stay on topic: spocalc is great. but if you're using measurements from a database, be careful -- make sure the name is *exactly* the same. lots of manufacturers have rims/hubs with similar names but different dimensions.
  12.  
    Rad Brandon, thank you so much![all your base are belong to us]
    •  
      CommentAuthorMorgie
    • CommentTimeFeb 24th 2010
     
    wtf, why does the dt-swiss database seem to only have dt hubs i feel like i'm missing something here.. i even registered with em bitches
    • CommentAuthortristan
    • CommentTimeFeb 24th 2010 edited
     
    Wow, it seems that the dt swiss calc has dropped all third party hub measurements from their database.
    What a buncha chumps.
    I take back all endorsement of said calculator.ascott430 - "Was going to build it up into a fixed gear until I realized I'd rather spend money and time on mountain bikes."
  13.  
    ^^really?! Weak sauce.clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
    • CommentAuthorBAUMANN
    • CommentTimeFeb 24th 2010
     
    thanks for the input folks, seems like this thread has become a good resource for a lot more than just spoke length, which is sweet. now i just need to wait for these tubular rims/tires to infuriate me enough to re-lace the hubs to something else...RIDE METAL
  14.  
    IF your lucky you can find the Dt swiss spoke calculator/graph, it's not online. It's basically just big flat piece of graph paper with all the measurements all laid out for you. You put the hub over one graph and the wheel over another and then follow the collums and do the simple math. It's by far the best resource I've ever used. Makes buildining wheels during a blackout wicked awesome!!!!
  15.  
    i just stumbled across this from www.freebiketools.org and it seems pretty effin rad... uses most of the spocalc DB it appears but it's web-based.
    • CommentAuthortristan
    • CommentTimeMay 21st 2010
     
    ^that is awesome. Calculated the same numbers I did by hand for a recent build, so I trust it. Thanks!ascott430 - "Was going to build it up into a fixed gear until I realized I'd rather spend money and time on mountain bikes."
    • CommentAuthorBAUMANN
    • CommentTimeSep 8th 2010 edited
     
    ^^using this calculator I got a spoke length of 293.5mm, is it better to go with 294mm spokes or 293mm? does 1mm even matter?RIDE METAL
    • CommentAuthortristan
    • CommentTimeSep 8th 2010
     
    I usually round down.ascott430 - "Was going to build it up into a fixed gear until I realized I'd rather spend money and time on mountain bikes."
  16.  
    doesn't really matter, but i round up FWIW.
  17.  
    well met tree, well met.
    • CommentAuthorBAUMANN
    • CommentTimeSep 8th 2010
     
    so basically, that means either will work?RIDE METAL
  18.  
    ^Yup, though you may as well err on the side of shorter.[all your base are belong to us]
  19.  
    yeah, it really doesn't make a difference. you're never going to miss or be glad you have that extra half mm of spoke.
    • CommentAuthorslowski
    • CommentTimeSep 8th 2010
     
    hey internet, is spoke gauge the same as wire gauge?If at first you don't succeed... you fail.
    • CommentAuthorgc
    • CommentTimeSep 8th 2010
     
    ^yes, assuming british/english scale. (the french use a different scale)gone
    • CommentAuthorBAUMANN
    • CommentTimeSep 8th 2010
     
    the collective knowledge on this forum is staggering. just sayin.RIDE METAL
    •  
      CommentAuthorsquaretaper
    • CommentTimeSep 8th 2010 edited
     
    round up- you want the spoke end to be at least flush with the nipple base- preventing possible nipple failure (internet?) by supporting the nipple's flange.

    worst case scenario you end up "cutting" an extra thread or so (yes i know that brass is softer than stainless) e.g. mechanical loc-tite.

    my 2 cents if i had 2.strong, light, cheap: pick two