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    • CommentAuthorben
    • CommentTimeApr 2nd 2010 edited
     
    It looks like people with advanced Parkinson's -- those who can't even walk more than a few feet -- are often able to ride bikes, sometimes for miles at a time, with no issues. I know nothing about neurology, but it sounds like a pretty astounding realization. There an interesting article in the Times.

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Cycling Provides a Break for Some With Parkinson’s

    By GINA KOLATA
    Published: March 31, 2010

    The man had had Parkinson’s disease for 10 years, and it had progressed until he was severely affected. Parkinson’s, a neurological disorder in which some of the brain cells that control movement die, had made him unable to walk. He trembled and could walk only a few steps before falling. He froze in place, his feet feeling as if they were bolted to the floor.

    But the man told Dr. Bloem something amazing: he said he was a regular exerciser — a cyclist, in fact — something that should not be possible for patients at his stage of the disease, Dr. Bloem thought.

    “He said, ‘Just yesterday I rode my bicycle for 10 kilometers’ — six miles,” Dr. Bloem said. “He said he rides his bicycle for miles and miles every day.”

    “I said, ‘This cannot be,’ ” Dr. Bloem, a professor of neurology and medical director of the hospital’s Parkinson’s Center, recalled in a telephone interview. “This man has end-stage Parkinson’s disease. He is unable to walk.”

    But the man was eager to demonstrate, so Dr. Bloem took him outside where a nurse’s bike was parked.

    “We helped him mount the bike, gave him a little push, and he was gone,” Dr. Bloem said. He rode, even making a U-turn, and was in perfect control, all his Parkinson’s symptoms gone.

    Yet the moment the man got off the bike, his symptoms returned. He froze immediately, unable to take a step.

    --The article continues hereI have DTF pants. They're crotchless. -surprisefries
  1.  
    this is rad. very interesting article that left me feeling optimistic.
    •  
      CommentAuthorjoeyfresh
    • CommentTimeApr 2nd 2010
     
    Yeah, Ben, thanks for posting. Nice article.We'll get you a cat, don't worry -t-honks
    •  
      CommentAuthordora
    • CommentTimeApr 2nd 2010
     
    that's awesome, really interesting article. i'm interested to know the outcome of their clinical trials whenever they finish.

    thanks for sharing!Must be awful, being so fluffy.
    • CommentAuthorgrev
    • CommentTimeApr 2nd 2010 edited
     
    a few months ago when i was down in nyc for a race i sprained my ankle at night and by the time i woke up the next day it was so swollen that i couldnt even stand because the pain was excruciating. i had to catch the bus which was 3 miles away, in less than an hour. i knew that taking a cab wasn't an option because i was physically incapable of getting in and out of a car. it took me 5 minutes to climb down 2 flights of stairs and probably half a minute to walk from the front door to the curb. it took me a little less than 15 minutes to bike from 1st & 4th to 34th & 8th.

    biking is relatively low stress, and once you get moving the bike balances itself. there are definitely a lot of disabled people out there who are more than able to ride a bike, the thought would just not seem plausible ("Ride a bike? I can't even walk!").

    the observations these guys made about physical activity and Parkinson's is quite different in the sense that the patients seemed to temporarily regain normal function of their bodies for the period of the activity and then instantaneously return to full blown Parkinson's.

    someone throw a Back to the Future race.not another pitcher!
    •  
      CommentAuthorjoeyfresh
    • CommentTimeApr 3rd 2010
     
    I fully support a Back to the Future race. I have a red puffy vest. "You stay fly, I'll stay McFly."We'll get you a cat, don't worry -t-honks
    • CommentAuthorjohn89
    • CommentTimeJun 11th 2016
     
    An exercise program targeting balance, leg strength, and freezing of gait did not reduce falls but improved physical and psychological health. Falls were reduced in people with milder disease but not in those with more severe Parkinson's disease.
    • CommentAuthorjohn89
    • CommentTimeJun 14th 2016
     
    john89:An exercise program targeting balance, leg strength, and freezing of gait did not reduce falls but improved physical and psychological health. Falls were reduced in people with milder disease but not in those with more severe Parkinson's disease.
    john89:An exercise program targeting balance, leg strength, and freezing of gait did not reduce falls but improved physical and psychological health. Falls were reduced in people with milder disease but not in those with more severe Parkinson's disease.
  2.  
    You said time was infinite, so why the watch wrapped around your wrist?