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  1.  
    ^nice

    We have a 12h power shutdown next week to inspect/replace some of the building electrical equipment. All our big freezers are on backup power, but all our small freezers (1 for every 2 people, plus like 4 common ones) are not. So they have to be cleaned out, defrosted, and all the stuff has to go somewhere in the big freezers. Yesterday I spent 2-3 hours cleaning out mine, and the 2 common ones in our tissue culture rooms. I had to bleach and pour out about 50 tubes/flasks/etc of old medium, serum, etc. that people had just left in the freezer. It sucked, but even worse is this, the beaker full of 15mL tubes and little 1.5mL tubes of varying concentrations of at least 10 different drugs ranging from antibiotics to chemotherapy drugs. Today I get to sort them and figure out the best way to dispose of them, because I don't want to be an asshole to EH&S and just hand them this beaker like, "Here you deal with it."


    hashtag realscienceDFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  2.  
    DOWN THE SINK BROYou said time was infinite, so why the watch wrapped around your wrist?
  3.  
    clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  4.  
    shhhhhhhDFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  5.  
    lol, in my lab, those wouldn't even be labeledi mean that looks like a 10 cat bag, easy
  6.  
    Oh, lots of them aren't. Or at least not legibly.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  7.  
    surprisefries:Oh, lots of them aren't. Or at least not legibly.


    Oh wait... we're supposed to label things?

    oops. ;)clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  8.  
    don't even get me started, brah

    At least I'm not the one who has to deal with unlabeled beakers of (bhemical?/biological?/both?) waste left in the fume hood.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2013
     
    surprisefries:
    because I don't want to be an asshole to EH&S and just hand them this beaker like, "Here you deal with it."

    Dirty secret: (at least at my institution) virtually all the organic hazardous waste goes into the same waste stream once it leaves the lab. Put it all in a glass bottle, and EHS will probably be happy to take it.Troglodytarum is latin for troll
  9.  
    I kind of suspected that was true; I can't imagine the treatment process is all that different for similar kinds of waste.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  10.  


    Recovering film canisters mid-air after reentry from the KH-9 HEXAGON orbital spy sattelite.You said time was infinite, so why the watch wrapped around your wrist?
  11.  
    On the note of lab safety, etc....


    clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  12.  
    That's what the temples of your safety glasses are for.You said time was infinite, so why the watch wrapped around your wrist?
  13.  
    repost?
    DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  14.  
    weird = i always wear glasses...i hardly get itchy eyes. as soon as i take them off? EYES ITCH ALL THE TIME.
  15.  
    paul jameson:...
    Recovering film canisters mid-air after reentry from the KH-9 HEXAGON orbital spy sattelite.

    Rad.

    Now reading about the one they had to recover from the ocean floor. FOIA linkDFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  16.  
    I just got photographed for the Globe (I think)...apparently I was the only person in my lab doing benchwork at the time. And it was just making buffers (mixing clear liquids with other clear liquids). Weird.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  17.  
    surprisefries:I just got photographed for the Globe (I think)...apparently I was the only person in my lab doing benchwork at the time. And it was just making buffers (mixing clear liquids with other clear liquids). Weird.


    Ah, I can see the headlines now, "MAD SCIENTIST PUTS CITY IN DANGER!"clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  18.  
    I think the headline will be
    MAD SCIENTIST NEEDS HAIR CUTYO NOT EVERYBODY GOES TO EAR SCHOOL OK
  19.  
    I have like 2 more inches to go before I can donate it!DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthorjoeyfresh
    • CommentTimeOct 24th 2013
     
    More like
    BORING SCIENTIST MAKES JUST ENOUGH MONEY TO FEED CHILD
    More lame shit at 11We'll get you a cat, don't worry -t-honks
    • CommentAuthorJimmyJ
    • CommentTimeOct 25th 2013
     
    surprisefries:I have like 2 more inches to go
  20.  
    joeyfresh:More like
    BORING SCIENTIST MAKES JUST ENOUGH MONEY TO FEED CHILD
    More lame shit at 11


    Makes me think of articles from The Onion. So good.clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  21.  
    ^That'd be a good one, I think. Though nothing will be as good for me as Fifth Grade Science Paper Doesn't Stand Up to Peer Review.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeOct 31st 2013
     
    Candidate for best science news story headline: Dark Matter Experiment Has Detected Nothing, Researchers Say Proudly

    The full article has some amusing bits as well, like this gem: "As has become de rigueur for such occasions, the scientists took pride and hope in how clearly they did not see anything."

    Science journalists goin' keerazy!Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
  22.  
    Well, they took pride in seeing nothing because That meant...that their detector was working so well that they would easily see a dark matter particle if and when it decided to drop by. In other words, extremely little noise in the detection. Which is awesome.

    Still, theoretical physicists are a pretty special group of people. I mean, these were the dude/ttes who were all, "Y'know I really hope the LHC doesn't find the Higgs boson 'cause it would only help to confirm our current model...boo-oooring."DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  23.  
    NASA is live-streaming the launch of MAVEN, scheduled to go up in about 10 minutes.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  24.  
    CRISPR, yea or nay? why or why not?i mean that looks like a 10 cat bag, easy
  25.  
    I could have actually answered this like a month or so ago after sitting though lab meeting about it, but I have pushed that out of my brain as something I don't really need. People are really excited about it though, and my PI is pushing the lab to start using it.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthoreburgers
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2013
     
    Although the possibilities for awesome awesome treatment modalities has just been blown wide open, I'm personally uneasy with applying CRISPR technology to the human genome. I almost feel like there's some serious moral/ethical gray area with modifying a human's genes, it's a slippery slope from targeting Huntington's or cystic fibrosis to it being misused. Also, I don't think we know (or will likely ever know) enough about the extent of the functions of DNA to be inactivating certain sequences known to play a role in disease processes, but also likely have other very important regulatory functions where a deliberate deletion may cause other pathologies that may or may not be just as harmful as the original targeted disease process.

    Sorry if that doesn't make much sense, I am so hungover right now.1) Stop watching the donkey porn.
  26.  
    I don't think CRISPR is anywhere near clinical? I mean it hasn't even been around very long. It's already being applied successfully to the human genome in the lab.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthoreburgers
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2013 edited
     
    No no it's definitely not anywhere near clinical stages, I'm just thinking super far ahead. Obviously it's going to be researched much more thoroughly and it'll be a long time before we'll see it used as a treatment modality (if it makes it that far) but I still think it's pretty sketchy to alter a human's DNA because even though we can draw generalities from research, there's still enough individual variation that the safety of gene modification is far from guaranteed. Although that doesn't really matter for people with Huntington's or other assuredly fatal diseases where the benefits far outweigh the risks, it's only a tiny percentage of genetic diseases that are the results of a single SNP or mutation, rather than polygenetic in origin.

    I'm not saying the technology itself doesn't work, and I think it's super cool, I'm just concerned for unintended consequences of applying it to live humans or fertilized embryos in the distant future


    ETA: also, after reading this article, I'm a bigger fan. the initial things I read didn't mention splicing in normal healthy DNA, just the deletion properties of CRISPR. I'm still gonna say it's a slippery slope, but nonetheless, really awesome.
    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=genetic-surgery-may-be-enabled-by-a-new-technology1) Stop watching the donkey porn.
  27.  
    Word. Remember what happened with gene therapy the first time around? It seems like people* are being more cautious these days, like with iPS cell therapy which is already in clinical trials.

    *like my PI/lab/collaboratorsDFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  28.  
    I meant in theory/mol bio/model orgs/in the lab. Everyone's super excited about it and relocating resources cause omg crispr, but it's not even necessarily that specific?

    I mean, obviously everyone's starting their grants with OMG THIS WILL ONEDAY BE SUPER GREAT FOR HUMANS BECAUSE, but that's sort of a pie in the sky at the mo.i mean that looks like a 10 cat bag, easy
  29.  
    ^yeah, gotta say that kinda shit to get papes. Like the whole tumor "stem cell" thing I worked on for years.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthoreburgers
    • CommentTimeDec 5th 2013
     
    Yeah sorry, I'm on the clinical side rather than labs, so my mind immediately jumps to those applications rather than the research process. Although I feel like I should do research at some point, but labs just don't really excite me/I'm not that patient1) Stop watching the donkey porn.
    •  
      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeDec 6th 2013
     
    ^^ yeah- i was at the broad retreat, and sat through two successive talks:

    The first:
    crisper- the new thing that's better than sliced bread!

    The second:
    siRNAs: the last thing that was better than sliced bread turns out to have some major issues after all.Troglodytarum is latin for troll
  30.  
    Yeah it's gonna be interesting/cray to see what happens with siRNA/RNAi in general.

    Speaking of tumor biology, there's a recent study showing that mice kept at human room temperature are more susceptible to tumors via immune suppression. Which could be a huge systemic problem.

    ScienceProblemsDFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  31.  
    it's like when I learned that some labs' fly "calorie restriction" diets were actually higher in calories than other labs' regular food

    I just read a manuscript out of my own lab that says "literature says there is tolerance for up to 5bp mismatch in a 23mer crispr guide" and then tests for off-targets using mismatches no less than 6bp.i mean that looks like a 10 cat bag, easy
  32.  
    hah.

    It's like when they discovered a whole bunch of ATCC cell lines are actually HeLa.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthorseanile mick
    • CommentTimeDec 7th 2013 edited
     
    Phobias may be memories passed down in genes from ancestors
    i wonder what terrible memory results in ketchup/tomato phobias.

    edit: and i ironically unintentionally may have found that answer. in reading a list of random food facts, "Tomatoes were originally thought to be poisonous."somebody turn the lights off on this place already.
  33.  
    Skeptical cat remains vigilant. Mostly that is just extremely poorly reported. There is a difference between an acquired epigenetic response to stimulus and "memories might be passed down in genes".i mean that looks like a 10 cat bag, easy
  34.  
    But...it's on the internetsomebody turn the lights off on this place already.
    •  
      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeDec 8th 2013
     
    tinyhonkshus:Skeptical cat remains vigilant. Mostly that is just extremely poorly reported. There is a difference between an acquired epigenetic response to stimulus and "memories might be passed down in genes".


    Yeah- there's a big difference between higher expression of a odor receptor, and "memories".Troglodytarum is latin for troll
  35.  
  36.  
    alsoDFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    • CommentAuthorObo
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2014
     
  37.  
    I'll have to look up the paper(s) when I have time, but of course I'm really skeptical. I mean, even if you really can them it into pluripotent cells, I think you'll still have some work to do to coax the cells into differentiating into whatever cell type you're after. But still that's like more than half the battle if it works.

    And to think I have spent the past several months working on transdifferentiation, LIKE A SUCKERDFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  38.  
    Here is the paper, via a (better IMO) BBC article. I can hook anyone up with the full text if you can't get it.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2014
     
    ^^ looks reasonable. Biggest issue, after replication, is the age of the mice they worked with- neonatal to 1 week old, with a little marginal note that said that this treatment simply kills cells from adult mice.Troglodytarum is latin for troll