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      CommentAuthorsourman
    • CommentTimeApr 5th 2013
     
    Hello everyone.

    I'm embarking on a research project for my Econometrics (statistics on crack + economic theory) class at Bentley University, and will be doing it on the economic effects of bikeshare programs on a few areas. So far, the largest thing I'd like to analyze is the effect of bikeshare stations on land/rent values in a 1/4 mile radius, controlling for other external amenities like schools, transit and other prevalent factors. I believe there will be an effect since major transit hubs tend to increase land values up to a certain distance. For this i will be using maps and zillow since I believe the MLS cannot get too detailed. As much as we may complain about crappy hubway users, I hope that this research will contribute to the larger, and lacking, area of bikeshare research to help disseminate it across American cities. No one has really looked into this that much in the US, though I have found all the relevant research pieces on it. So far, all the economic effects are subjectively derived, of which they've done little work on it.

    I'm still thinking about some other areas to study a relationship on relevant to bikeshare too. I could tweak this to look at the the land values of homes that are now in the first mile/last mile (you live just a little bit too far from the transit stop and must ride a short distance) category.

    I do have heaps of data from the hubway data visualization challenge (http://hubwaydatachallenge.org/) as well. It provides not only all the stats on every bikeshare trip, but that on stations, member demographics, and a bunch of other goodies they threw in there like sidewalk data. Also, the focus was originally going to be on hubway in Boston because of familiarity with neighborhoods and what not, but since it is only on its 3rd year, I reckon there wouldn't be much of an effect on land values in such a short amount of time. Other cities have had established programs for longer and they may be a more suitable candidate such as DC or Portland. As much as I'd love to check this out, say in Paris, I think trying to navigate heaps of research and data would prove difficult.



    Why I'm posting this:

    Looking for suggestions

    New relationships to estimate

    Looking for more data

    Support

    Know anyone who's looked into this?

    any and all comments are appreciated! thanks guise!
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      CommentAuthorNuggetross
    • CommentTimeApr 5th 2013
     
    i think you're right. i'm not sure if you will find much of a change with the short amount of time hubway has been around. what about increased business activity along typical hubway user routes? have the data? or too easy?

    i'd be interested to see if how much hubway is offsetting other modes of transportation or walking. not sure if you could finagle data for that. but that could lead into other positive externalities, like reduced pollution, increased physical activity, more farting, bigger butts, etc.
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      CommentAuthorsourman
    • CommentTimeApr 5th 2013
     
    Nuggetross:i think you're right. i'm not sure if you will find much of a change with the short amount of time hubway has been around. what about increased business activity along typical hubway user routes? have the data? or too easy?

    i'd be interested to see if how much hubway is offsetting other modes of transportation or walking. not sure if you could finagle data for that. but that could lead into other positive externalities, like reduced pollution, increased physical activity, more farting, bigger butts, etc.


    Dave, I too really wanted to look at business activity. people have looked into that, but again, it was totally subjective "do you think that having a hub way near by increases your total business". too look at it from a stats standpoint though, there isnt really data on individual stores. I doubt you could find gdp data for a given area code, but it could be possible. aside from that, you could ask owners to tell you the changes in revenue, but i doubt they'd do so. Interestingly enough, the majority of boston hubway users: 1.) are more educated (fairly high undergrad rate and beyond), and have higher income than the average non-bikeshare user. What I think would be really rad is to look at the economic activity in areas that only have a bikeshare station, but no transit hub (t-stop/bus stop)

    hubway does offset pub trans use by a certain percentage, studies show. I'm totally sure you could finagle data from MBTA on routes along bikeshare stations though. Regarding walking, I dont think there is the data for that.

    Thank you for your thoughts.
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      CommentAuthormrotown
    • CommentTimeApr 5th 2013
     
    I'm not sure what their algorithm takes into account but zillow is wildly all over the place. I don't know how much those numbers actually tell you about real property values.e-f-f-e-c-t a smooth operater operating correctly
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      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeApr 6th 2013
     
    sourman: I could tweak this to look at the the land values of homes that are now in the first mile/last mile (you live just a little bit too far from the transit stop and must ride a short distance) category.


    DQ: Don't you have to return the bike after a set amount of time? I don't know that Hubways would be the most practical choice for intermodal commutes, which means you probably wouldn't see any effect at all.

    Also, I think you'd need to corroborate a few cities of data to prove your correlation.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
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      CommentAuthorsourman
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    New possible regressions:

    effect of a subway stop vs a bus stop on station usage? I wanted to look at the effect of the proximity of a transit stop near a hubway, but looking at the map, it seems as if most all of the stations are located super close to/on a transit line, except for the one's at universities. correct me if i'm wrong/you know of hubway stations not near a transit line (+.5 miles)

    nerdo:
    sourman: I could tweak this to look at the the land values of homes that are now in the first mile/last mile (you live just a little bit too far from the transit stop and must ride a short distance) category.


    DQ: Don't you have to return the bike after a set amount of time? I don't know that Hubways would be the most practical choice for intermodal commutes, which means you probably wouldn't see any effect at all.

    Also, I think you'd need to corroborate a few cities of data to prove your correlation.


    you do have to return the bikes, preferably within 30 minutes, but why do you think they're not a good intermodal commute method?

    In the future I can mix in more cities, but for the meantime I'm just trying to run this basic regression and graduate uni!
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      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    ^Because you have to return them? You can't just get off a train and ride home, unless you happen to have a Hubway station right outside your house. Or am I fundamentally misunderstanding how these things work?Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
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      CommentAuthorsourman
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    ^^you're correct nerdo in your understanding, you would need a bike station outside your house.
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      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    Maybe it's because I live in the suburbs right now, but I can't imagine somebody living within close proximity to a Hubway station but far enough from a mass transit station that would make riding a Hubway home from the T more practical than, say, taking the bus or just owning their own bike. But I do see that there are plenty of Hubway stations in non-T-served neighborhoods, so maybe I'm wrong. Really, I'm just sad that there isn't good intermodal integration between Hubway and the commuter rail.

    An aside: How is it that Hubway's annual membership is more expensive than Zipcar's?Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
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      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    When I have to use public transportation, which so far has only been when I'm flying somewhere after work, which was only once...since I'd have to take the T + bus to get from Davis Sq area to the South End, I took the T to Central and then Hubway'd it from there. There isn't a Hubway close enough to my house to take it the whole way. Then I Hubway'd after work to South Station and got on the Silverline to the Airport from there. So it works as an intermodal commute method if the MBTA can't get you the whole way there but there isn't a Hubway near your house.
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      CommentAuthorsourman
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    nerdo:Maybe it's because I live in the suburbs right now, but I can't imagine somebody living within close proximity to a Hubway station but far enough from a mass transit station that would make riding a Hubway home from the T more practical than, say, taking the bus or just owning their own bike. But I do see that there are plenty of Hubway stations in non-T-served neighborhoods, so maybe I'm wrong. Really, I'm just sad that there isn't good intermodal integration between Hubway and the commuter rail.

    An aside: How is it that Hubway's annual membership is more expensive than Zipcar's?


    For research purposes, do you think you could name some of those locations with a hubway but no MBTA access please?

    while yes its $25 more, i'd say the rates for actual usage are less. a zipcar at the least, after tax, comes out to mayb $8-10/hr, even after fronting the annual fee. so if you actually use the zipcar...2-3 times in the year, you've already exceed the cost of a hubway membership (albeit you didn't run over the 30 min point with the hubway)
  1.  
    DATA POINT! My coworker lives in Littleton, and either walks, gets dropped off, drives, or takes his own bike to the commuter rail (I don't know). Then he takes the train to North Station and rides a Hubway to LMA. Ruggles to LMA would also be a good Hubway trip: there's a shuttle that runs rarely and takes about the same time as walking, such that if you bother waiting, it'll take longer than walking. Also "owning your own bike" is less practical than Hubway if you want to do internmodal during rush hour.i mean that looks like a 10 cat bag, easy
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      CommentAuthor6kidz
    • CommentTimeApr 8th 2013
     
    I appreciate that you're doing research to help people understand more about bike usage in the city.

    However, I think a descriptive study would be much more effective than what you're currently proposing. There's a lot to be learned from what Marianna's friend is doing as a specific case and apply that to a larger context. I don't see how you could isolate enough variables in your current study of bus stop vs t stop on station use to have statistical significance. Have you revised your idea since your last post?"Dude's just smashing fructosenormativity, lay off."
    • CommentAuthorlucycandy
    • CommentTimeApr 13th 2013
     
    I do see that there are plenty of Hubway stations in non-T-served neighborhoods, so maybe I'm wrong. Really, I'm just sad that there isn't good intermodal integration between Hubway and the commuter rail.






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    SENTIENT SPAMNaaaah, too uncool for the #messlyfe. I just like to hang out in loading docks and pretend to talk on my radio so that people will like me. - Mfratt
    • CommentAuthorjohngrimes
    • CommentTimeApr 13th 2013
     
    It would be interesting to see Your research results. As far I can comprehend, the effect of stations on rent of places around must be highly affected.


    <a href="http://www.quotemeaprice.com/annuity/">annuity settlements</a>
    • CommentAuthortristan
    • CommentTimeApr 13th 2013
     
    The lucycandy spambot is pretty clever. It's taking a couple sentences from earlier in the thread (pages back, even) and reposting them. The interesting bit is that its even modifying sentences a little bit for clarity/originality. In lucy's post above, it chopped off a "But" that was at the beginning of the sentence, probably because that just doesn't make any sense to start a post with.
    I bet this strategy has a relatively high success rate, since it'll match content and style of any given forum. Of course, they could have bothered to apply the same smarts to the links, too.ascott430 - "Was going to build it up into a fixed gear until I realized I'd rather spend money and time on mountain bikes."