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  1.  
    They are kinda cheap at Bed, Bombs, and Beyond. For all your domestic (terrorism) needs.

    I feel like I am living in the movie Brazil now.All you white kids look alike when you're still covered in baby fat, so I was getting bored with the non-stop WASP parade.
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      CommentAuthorjoeyfresh
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2013
     
    Don't tell the FBI, but I have a WMD in my pants.We'll get you a cat, don't worry -t-honks
  2.  
    Wicked Massive Dildo?All you white kids look alike when you're still covered in baby fat, so I was getting bored with the non-stop WASP parade.
  3.  
    ha

    Man, add Brazil to the list of movies I wanna watch soon (in this case it would be watch again though).

    They're also probably worth the cost for the ease and effectiveness.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    • CommentAuthorben
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2013
     
    Yo Joe Chris just burned you illa mad good homie g-dawgI have DTF pants. They're crotchless. -surprisefries
  4.  
    I find it funny that people are focused on whether a simple bomb could be a WMD, as opposed to whether the government can prove one of the other elements of 18 USC §2332A(a)(2).

    Oh, youz!

    TD;DR: it appears a run-of-the-mill bomb can be a WMD if some other elements are proven.
    •  
      CommentAuthortyler
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2013
     
    All in favor of work camps say aye
    that dirtbag has got a good 50 years of rock-breakin in him
    • CommentAuthortristan
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2013
     
    Something that is interesting to me: the fact that these guys had little to no training (it seems this way at the time of my writing this), and still managed to wound 200+, kill several people, and have a pretty serious firefight with cops. This can be used as an argument against any increased surveillance, tightened security, what-have-you. Nothing is ever going to stop a grass-roots, home-grown attack - the only thing we'd accomplish with additional/stricter regulations as a result of this is an increase in security theater, and an increase in the day-to-day burden of the average citizen. Nothing could have changed what happened.
    Russia tipped us off to the older brother, he was interviewed, and had committed no crime and provided no cause for further action. To go further and theoretically prevent this, we would have had to arrest him then and there. Obviously, we aren't going to arrest anybody Russia tells us to.

    At the same time, many of our appointed government official are going to try to introduce (or back) increased security measures after this point; security measures that will only serve to impede our own rights in the name of "fighting terrorism." This is wrong, and while I realize that most of you can see this, I hope that maybe one or two more than usual will take a moment to write their representatives in opposition to any new "anti-terrorism" bills that may arise as a result of this event.ascott430 - "Was going to build it up into a fixed gear until I realized I'd rather spend money and time on mountain bikes."
  5.  
    I don't know if I entirely agree nothing could have been done (at least in terms of stopping the bombing as it happened)... tighter control of access to the Boylston Street portion of the course is doable I think... with bomb-sniffing dogs inspecting bags of people entering?

    Still, it is true there's nothing that can be done to stop something like this from happening in plenty of other places along the route that can't be easily contained.
    • CommentAuthortristan
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2013
     
    it is shit like this.ascott430 - "Was going to build it up into a fixed gear until I realized I'd rather spend money and time on mountain bikes."
    •  
      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeApr 23rd 2013
     
    From all the sources that I read, it seems like the most likely motivation for this whole mess was the brothers, particularly Tamerlan's, sense of never really fitting in. I feel we're in a shitty vicious cycle where we discriminate against people who are different, they feel unaccepted and marginalized, a few wacko outliers react violently to frustrations related to this, and then the majority group cites that as a reason to continue discriminating. It's very upsetting and I think will only perpetuate violent acts like this.

    In my opinion, pretty much all atrocities in human history can be traced to discrimination/viewing people who are different as "other" or less than human. Most people aren't capable of butchering others until they've found a way to dehumanize their victims first.
  6.  
    ratattack:From all the sources that I read, it seems like the most likely motivation for this whole mess was the brothers, particularly Tamerlan's, sense of never really fitting in. I feel we're in a shitty vicious cycle where we discriminate against people who are different, they feel unaccepted and marginalized, a few wacko outliers react violently to frustrations related to this, and then the majority group cites that as a reason to continue discriminating. It's very upsetting and I think will only perpetuate violent acts like this.

    In my opinion, pretty much all atrocities in human history can be traced to discrimination/viewing people who are different as "other" or less than human. Most people aren't capable of butchering others until they've found a way to dehumanize their victims first.
    All you white kids look alike when you're still covered in baby fat, so I was getting bored with the non-stop WASP parade.
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2013
     
    ratattack:From all the sources that I read, it seems like the most likely motivation for this whole mess was the brothers, particularly Tamerlan's, sense of never really fitting in. I feel we're in a shitty vicious cycle where we discriminate against people who are different, they feel unaccepted and marginalized, a few wacko outliers react violently to frustrations related to this, and then the majority group cites that as a reason to continue discriminating. It's very upsetting and I think will only perpetuate violent acts like this.

    In my opinion, pretty much all atrocities in human history can be traced to discrimination/viewing people who are different as "other" or less than human. Most people aren't capable of butchering others until they've found a way to dehumanize their victims first.


    There's a lot of truth in this. The refreshing thing is that it seems most sane media outlets are reporting some version of this outlook. What I find interesting, and what nobody seems to be saying, is that these two decided to attack an event that's more a symbol of Boston than of America. I don't think it's a matter of coincidence nor convenience, particularly watching our special Bostonian jingoism flare up after the attack. Boston is the most unwelcoming town to be an outsider I've ever encountered. The more defined the sense of "us" there is, the more likely there's a "them" to feel persecuted, actively or passively judged/denied/discarded/ignored. I see it in this community, where outsiders or dissenting voices or naïve newbies are quickly ridiculed off the boards. And I see it in all the "One Boston" and "Don't Mess With Our Town" bullshit going around, which looks suspiciously similar to the insiderist, us-vs-them culture that alienated these men in the first place. Yes, mourn the victims. Yes, punish the perpetrators. But then look to yourself and ask how our supposedly open community could breed such deep inhumanity. One Boston indeed.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
  7.  
    I think you guys are taking this a little far... I doubt "I do not understand them" is rooted in Bostonians standoffishness (hadn't mentioned this up until now, but my downstairs neighbor knew them... they used to be neighbors on Norfolk Street, and Tamerlan invited her ex-husband to attend some boxing matches). From the sound of it Tamerlan adopted a relatively extreme form of Islam, and it was us who were the outsiders in his mind.
  8.  
    Cheez:... From the sound of it Tamerlan adopted a relatively extreme form of Islam, and it was us who were the outsiders in his mind.

    This.

    But it doesn't diminish or invalidate everything else said.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  9.  
    Craigglesofdoom:Does anyone else think that pressure cookers seem like a very uneconomical delivery method? Those things are expensive.

    it's nothing compared to the cost of human lives.

    also, lauren is spot on:

    chr|s sedation:
    ratattack:From all the sources that I read, it seems like the most likely motivation for this whole mess was the brothers, particularly Tamerlan's, sense of never really fitting in. I feel we're in a shitty vicious cycle where we discriminate against people who are different, they feel unaccepted and marginalized, a few wacko outliers react violently to frustrations related to this, and then the majority group cites that as a reason to continue discriminating. It's very upsetting and I think will only perpetuate violent acts like this.

    In my opinion, pretty much all atrocities in human history can be traced to discrimination/viewing people who are different as "other" or less than human. Most people aren't capable of butchering others until they've found a way to dehumanize their victims first.
    You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
    •  
      CommentAuthorStinky Cheez
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2013 edited
     
    I don't disagree entirely, but it seems like the tip of the iceberg (we aren't just a bunch of meanies who aren't welcoming/inclusive enough, our government also kills people - muslim people - all the time, while we go on living our lives like nothing's doing - I would think that would be powerful stuff for an impressionable person who sees themselves as an outgrowth of Chechnya).

    I keep thinking about that book American Pastoral. Different, similar...
    • CommentAuthorObo
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2013
     
    Cheez:I don't disagree entirely, but it seems like the tip of the iceberg (we aren't just a bunch of meanies who aren't welcoming/inclusive enough, our government also kills people - muslim people - all the time, while we go on living our lives like nothing's doing - I would think that would be powerful stuff for an impressionable person who sees themselves as an outgrowth of Chechnya).


    In a lot of ways, we are a bunch of meanines. The "keeping up with the Joneses"/consumer symbols mentality is as strong as ever. It may not be 5th grade school bully wedgie meanie... but its having the same effect psychologically. And +100 for what we do to the rest of the world.I ONLY WEAR CAMPY CONDOMS WITH WHITE WRAPS - joeyfresh
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      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2013
     
    That fact that our insiderism is extended to national policy probably fueled an alienation that already existed. Though if Tamerlan were reacting solely to Chechnyan geo/religio-political forces, he'd have bombed a target in Russia while he was there. I think there was an element of vendetta at play here. Interesting to hear what the younger brother has to say when/if he's able to communicate.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    • CommentAuthorspokenword
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2013
     
    ratattack:From all the sources that I read, it seems like the most likely motivation for this whole mess was the brothers, particularly Tamerlan's, sense of never really fitting in. I feel we're in a shitty vicious cycle where we discriminate against people who are different, they feel unaccepted and marginalized, a few wacko outliers react violently to frustrations related to this, and then the majority group cites that as a reason to continue discriminating. It's very upsetting and I think will only perpetuate violent acts like this.
    That narrative makes sense for Tamerlan, but less so for Dzhokar. The kid seemed popular -- captain of his high school wrestling team, had friends in school who still couldn't believe that he did it, etc. There's some sense in the idea of a young kid idolizing their older sibling; but it's also notable that their parents essentially broke up and left them to their own devices as adults. This strikes me as a collision of cultural alienation, broken family, and one guy who just couldn't find his niche in society along with a loyal brother.

    I think that may be more common amongst many immigrants, but being a foreigner isn't necessary to the process. It's possible to be American and face the frustrations of trying to find a job or a good group of peers, and without the support of a good family -- all of your frustration and anger turns into resentment which leads into violence. That doesn't have to be a terrorist bombing. You can just be the mean surly guy at the bar who's always picking fights and lashing out at anyone you think is being superior to you. You can be someone who gets involved in organized crime because, hey, at least they'll take you in.

    While, yes, the militarized foreign policy is immensely harmful, and, yes, an increasingly xenophobic immigration policy isn't helping, this is fundamentally another aspect of someone falling through the cracks and lashing out.
    •  
      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2013 edited
     
    While that's true, it definitely seems like Tamerlan had a much harder time fitting in, I think there's still a lot of conflict for Dzhokar. They keep talking about how Dzhokar had an internet profile where he lists his beliefs as "Islam" but goals as "Money and career", which are somewhat conflicting. I imagine he was in a weird position, somewhat stuck between where he came from, his family, religious pressures (as in, don't drink, don't smoke, don't be materialistic - actual Islamic tenants, not "go blow people up") and his life in America. On his twitter he said something along the lines of "I've been here a decade...is it time to leave yet?" (that's paraphrasing, I can't find the list of his tweets that I read that in) along with mentioning frustrations of people associating Islam with terrorism. That shows some discontent and with his parents leaving and radical pressure from his brother...I can see all that culminating in a pretty big identity struggle and a sense of not quite fitting in anywhere, regardless of apparent outward social success.

    ETA - I'm not saying any of that is a reason to blow people up. I just think all of that is part of the reason why, despite his friends being in such disbelief over his actions, he was apparently able to be swayed by his brother into thinking it was a decent idea to BLOW PEOPLE UP.
    • CommentAuthorspokenword
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2013
     
    that's true, but that's a very personal struggle and not something that society can solve on its own.

    I've been in the US for 21 years. I still don't have a Green Card (though one is in process). I might have to leave the country in September if the green card application falls through. I have many groups of friends who accept me and a job that is fine and a lot of outward measures of success, but, for various reasons, that isn't a guarantee that I'll actually get to live here. That kind of messes with my head and continues to reinforce this sense of being Other.

    However, even if I did become a permanent resident and if I chose to become a citizen, there will always be an Otherness that lingers in my head, simply because I grew up in a different place and a different culture; and all of us are always choosing what parts of ourselves we want to keep and what parts we no longer need. You can't make someone assimilate and integrate, but you can support them if they choose to do so. If they choose to settle in a place, they should have opportunities and possibilities for laying down roots.

    I think a tough thing with being an immigrant, and especially with being an immigrant kid where you are moved somewhere because your parents made a choice, but the choice wasn't yours is that you can grow up in some place and realize that it's not for you. However, you can't go home because home isn't really home anymore either. If I were to move back to the Philippines, everyone that I knew would look at me and just say that I was so Western, and they'd be right. I'd imagine that these guys would've faced the same problem. So unless you're able to find someway to reconcile your multiple influences and turn it into some kind of strength, it just leaves you trapped in this confused limbo of cultures, unable to accept belonging to any one place.
    • CommentAuthorObo
    • CommentTimeApr 24th 2013
     
    Don't know if we've seen/talked about this article but the take away points:

    1) The last four individual acts of violence/domestic terrorism were all based on reactions to our foreign police (details in the article)

    2) From the article:
    First, some leading American opinion-makers love to delude themselves and mislead others into believing that the US is attacked despite the fact that it is peaceful, peace-loving, freedom-giving and innocent. As these myth-makers would have it, we don't bother anyone; we just mind our own business (except when we're helping and liberating everyone), so why would anyone possibly want to attack us?

    Second, it's crucial to understand this causation because it's often asked "what can we do to stop Terrorism?" The answer is right in front of our faces: we could stop embracing the polices in that part of the world which fuel anti-American hatred and trigger the desire for vengeance and return violence. Yesterday at a Senate hearing on drones, a young Yemeni citizen whose village was bombed by US drones last week (despite the fact that the targets could easily have been arrested), Farea Al-Muslimi, testified. Al-Muslimi has always been pro-American in the extreme, having spent a year in the US due to a State Department award, but he was brilliant in explaining these key points:

    "Just six days ago, my village was struck by a drone, in an attack that terrified thousands of simple, poor farmers. The drone strike and its impact tore my heart, much as the tragic bombings in Boston last week tore your hearts and also mine.

    "What radicals had previously failed to achieve in my village one drone strike accomplished in an instant: there is now an intense anger and growing hatred of America."
    I ONLY WEAR CAMPY CONDOMS WITH WHITE WRAPS - joeyfresh
  10.  
    ^ Nailed it.All you white kids look alike when you're still covered in baby fat, so I was getting bored with the non-stop WASP parade.
  11.  
    i'm really into most of what glenn greenwald writes. gonna sit down with it later.

    right now i'm just relieved to hear the death penalty will not be reinstated.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
  12.  
    A friend of mine who was Death Stared at the Marathon talks to CNN today...

    http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/us/2013/04/24/lead-boston-bombing-victim-ice-official.cnnAll you white kids look alike when you're still covered in baby fat, so I was getting bored with the non-stop WASP parade.
    •  
      CommentAuthorjoeyfresh
    • CommentTimeApr 25th 2013
     
    Thanks for sharing that, Chris.We'll get you a cat, don't worry -t-honks