Not signed in (Sign In)

Category Filter

Welcome, Guest

Want to take part in these discussions? Sign in if you have an account, or apply for one below

Vanilla 1.1.8 is a product of Lussumo. More Information: Documentation, Community Support.

  1.  
    We are engineering students at MIT who are building a device (Terrainer) for competitive cyclists to train outdoors. To further improve our project, we are looking for competitive cyclists to help test and provide feedback on our product.

    We would really appreciate it if you can help us with our first round of testing this weekend outside Z-Center on the opposite side of its Vassar entrance, closer to Kresge (120 Vassar, Cambridge, MA 02139) or inside Z-Center if raining:

    Friday, 10am-8pm (except 1-2pm)
    Saturday, 10am-6pm
    Sunday, 10am-8pm
    Below is a doodle so you can sign up for a 15-min slot with your availability: http://doodle.com/xzhse2m74ce7yysz. Even if you are running late or can't commit, please feel free to stop by during any of the times listed above.

    We will provide a bike and a prototype, so you will not need to bring anything else.

    Please let us know if you have any questions. We appreciate your time!

    Best,
    MIT Terrainer Development Team
  2.  
    So, can you explain how this is different than a bicycle?i mean that looks like a 10 cat bag, easy
    •  
      CommentAuthor6kidz
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2014
     
    Do you have any more info on the product?"Dude's just smashing fructosenormativity, lay off."
    •  
      CommentAuthorFancy
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2014
     
    I found some info on the interwebs:

    http://vimeo.com/107899816
    and
    http://vimeo.com/110470132
  3.  
    Get out.'Cause i always say i love you when i mean turn out the lights.
  4.  
    ha.



    hahahaha.somebody turn the lights off on this place already.
    •  
      CommentAuthorNandy
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2014
     
    Wait, I don't have sound on this computer. Is it a thing that puts extra resistance on your bike?"life is hard, cats are soft." - surprisefries
  5.  
    thats what it looks like.
    pedaling harder to go faster just didnt make sense anymore.somebody turn the lights off on this place already.
    •  
      CommentAuthorNandy
    • CommentTimeNov 12th 2014 edited
     
    Huh. I rode a 200+lbs trike for work for years. It makes you a certain kind of strong, but it's horrible for race training. Why don't they just make something to make indoor trainers useful, like generating power for the TV you're watching because trainers are miserable and everyone hates them? People seem to have regular outdoor training down pretty well. You, uh, ride your bike faster."life is hard, cats are soft." - surprisefries
    •  
      CommentAuthorDavid9999999
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2014 edited
     
    Sooo it's basically like riding around while holding the brakes? Interesting.

    Also- does anyone else see potential risk with a computerized front brake that will apply stopping force at random to your front wheel?..
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2014
     
    ^I didn't watch the video but, yes, front brake is a stupid place to apply this. Back brake would be better. And you'd have to convince me that it's somehow better than just increasing your drag coefficient or riding heavier wheels.

    Training indoors really is the pits, though.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
  6.  
    This doesn't make any sense at all.Naaaah, too uncool for the #messlyfe. I just like to hang out in loading docks and pretend to talk on my radio so that people will like me. - Mfratt
  7.  
    well, there you have it folks. your target market has spoken!somebody turn the lights off on this place already.
  8.  
    I'm not sure we are the target market. Try BostonFreds.us, I bet they'll love it.DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
  9.  


    MIT should be banned from even thinking about bicycles.You said time was infinite, so why the watch wrapped around your wrist?
    •  
      CommentAuthorNandy
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2014
     
    How about a class project to make driving cars shittier?"life is hard, cats are soft." - surprisefries
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeNov 13th 2014
     
    Ok I watched the videos, even the long one. I thought they were pretty smart during the q&a, though there are still some huge shortcomings to the basic concept. The biggest one: people don't train indoors because they can't find hills; they train indoors because we have this thing called winter. Also, as anybody who's ever biked outside knows, you can't go too far without hitting some kind of hill. What happens when that coincides with your computerized climb? A better implementation would be some kind of enhancement of the surrounding terrain, where existing inclines are magnified by a certain degree, making them use as much power as a steeper climb. You'd solve the problem of interval recovery and make your boring old training route suddenly new again. Of course, that would mean adding GPS and topographical map integration. But then you could also calculate a maximum virtual grade (which could even be determined by each user) above which the system would stop adding resistance and therefore preventing the problem of a cyclist encountering an actual 20% grade right at the moment that the system is adding a virtual 20% grade.

    Finally, the way this thing is being conceived and marketed is, I think, misguided. The developers seem to be aiming for a target audience of people who want to do intense hill training but who can't be bothered to find a hill. I suppose I've heard complaints from some Chicago friends that they can't find hills to train on. So maybe there's a small market there. But it seems to me that they're aiming for an audience who want to get a quick, convenient workout but who would also fork over hundreds of dollars for a special bicycle training wheel. I don't see there being much overlap between those two markets.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    •  
      CommentAuthortone
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2014
     
    ^ Couldn't that be done with an accelerometer instead of GPS and map integration, eliminating the need for communication? If the bike is at a certain incline add that much more resistance until it becomes too much.We are the small axe.
    • CommentAuthorMJ
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2014
     
    tone:^ Couldn't that be done with an accelerometer instead of GPS and map integration, eliminating the need for communication? If the bike is at a certain incline add that much more resistance until it becomes too much.


    Sounds like that would work as well.

    In re
    nerdo:But it seems to me that they're aiming for an audience who want to get a quick, convenient workout but who would also fork over hundreds of dollars for a special bicycle training wheel. I don't see there being much overlap between those two markets.


    Admittedly I haven't watched the video; but as a secondary issue, on top of the hundreds of dollars spent on the wheel, I'd be interested in seeing the projected cost occurred from higher levels of wear and tear on the other bicycle components.
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2014
     
    tone:^ Couldn't that be done with an accelerometer instead of GPS and map integration, eliminating the need for communication? If the bike is at a certain incline add that much more resistance until it becomes too much.


    Oh yeah, you're smart. This is why I'm not an engineer.

    I was thinking GPS because I was imagining being able to pre-map rides and adding training segments where they most made sense to the workout I was wanting to get...Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    •  
      CommentAuthortone
    • CommentTimeNov 14th 2014
     
    They should do both methods so you could customize it or set it to automatic.We are the small axe.