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    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008
     
    Thought I'd see what Boston folks are into...

    Just started Ford Maddox Ford's <i>Parade's End</i> but not really getting into it... I may put it down and finally read Gulag Archipelago. Recently read <i>Omega Minor</i> by Paul Verhaeghen which I enjoyed, as well as Nicola Barker's <i>Darkmans</i>... the jury is still out on that one.

    So what are you reading?
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      CommentAuthorravnos
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008
     
    Finished Pratchett & Gaiman's "Good Omens" the other day, working on "World War Z" currently, after this I'm going to pick up "House of Leaves" I think.Question Reality. "Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear."
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      CommentAuthorHamburger
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008 edited
     
    currently juggling "driven to distraction", "your money or your life", and "bloodletting & miraculous cures"

    just finished "love is a mixtape" and a clash biography

    i <3's readingPeople make decisions.
    •  
      CommentAuthorDan Roch
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008
     
    "Jesus' son" by Denis JohnsonEverybody was saying we must have more leisure. Now they are complaning they are unemployed - Prince Philip during the recession in 1981
  1.  
    i haven't been reading nearly as much as i want to. i read for hours every day over break, though.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
  2.  
    Reading like 10 different biomedical ethics books, as well as some econ and theo.clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  3.  
    Fredrick Jackson Turner's THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE FRONTIER IN AMERICAN HISTORY for school. *Yawns
    -robot[all your base are belong to us]
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      CommentAuthortony_miami
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008
     
    John Tillman Lyle's "Regenerative Design for Sustainable Development", I think its a pretty good overview of regenerative deign basics and implementationfirst you get the money, then you get the power, and then you get the women
    •  
      CommentAuthormur
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008
     
    now? bostonfixed.us/forum/~(..,)~ (oYo) make whoopee not war (oYo) ~(..,)~
    •  
      CommentAuthorstilgar
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008
     
    Just re-read for like the tenth time the hitchhikers guide, plus I read dune like once a year, also reading "why we get sick, the new science of evolutionary medicine" and I just reserved a bunch of books from the library so that should be fun as well, I read a lot.this wont hurt a bit...
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      CommentAuthorMorgie
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008
     
    I'm not in to reading very often (a lil disabled actually)... but I'm audiobooking/youtubing Cornell West a lot these days..
    • CommentAuthorbluedog
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008
     
    i'm in the midst of re-reading cryptonomicon.that's when I reach for my revovler...
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      CommentAuthorfox
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008
     
    golden bough, Frazer
    • CommentAuthorkanst
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008
     
    I have a tendency to read a bunch of books at the same time. Right now I am readying A Brief History of Time by Stephen Hawking, a book about Game Theory, and ive been meaning to finish Of Heaven and Hell by Aldous Huxley.
    • CommentAuthormannnnnn
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008
     
    Am currently working on Till We Have Faces by Lewis, for one class, and am about to start At Swim, Two Boys by I can't remember his name, but I know he's Irish, for another.
    I recently finished The Darwin Conspiracy by something or other Dalton (I think), it was pretty entertaining.
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      CommentAuthorMungoRocks
    • CommentTimeFeb 18th 2008
     
    Seit und Zeindongpincher 1000
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      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeFeb 19th 2008
     
    fox:golden bough, Frazer


    "the horror". get it?

    i've been on a dennis lehane jag. his books are boston as fuck.
  4.  
    The Necronomicon, by Abdul Alhazred.Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.
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      CommentAuthor0x000000
    • CommentTimeFeb 19th 2008
     
    hitchhiker's guide omnibus for the first timewhat does he commute to clowntown on that thing
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      CommentAuthorsmelliott
    • CommentTimeFeb 19th 2008
     
    A Confederacy of Dunces by john kennedy toole. and invincible by robert kirkman.I’m the paté on the Universal cracker. I’m the grout holding your shower tiles on. I’m out of the saddle, sprinting up that hill and eating glazed donut bracelets off the right arm of Jesus.
  5.  
    I'm reading this:

    Word nerd
  6.  
    ^+1

    Just read sections of Hebrew Bible for classes (Deut 18, Josh 2-6, Lev 23, Ez 25) and now reading various commentary regarding gender and "other" issues in the text. Also making passing reference to the large amount of sexual ref. in the text and as how this might play out with the previous theme.

    Later, ECON!clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  7.  
    Aaron Gigantic:The Necronomicon, by Abdul Alhazred.

    of course.
    • CommentAuthorNicole
    • CommentTimeFeb 19th 2008
     
    just finished "No One Belongs Here More Than You" by Miranda July, it ruled.

    right now im reading "Introducing Postmodernism"
  8.  
    Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows!....


    ....what?


    .....no one else?<3 Katty Class
  9.  
    psht, i already finished it.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
  10.  
    ^^
    clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  11.  
    conor:psht, i already finished it.



    I'm sorry I didn't specify:

    I'm rereading The Deathly Hallows. (I'm supah lame)<3 Katty Class
    • CommentAuthorGrim Ryan
    • CommentTimeFeb 19th 2008
     
    house of leavesDuffman Can't Breathe
    • CommentAuthorboundgear
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008
     
    DannyRocks:Seit und Zein


    AKA Sein und Zeit?

    I'll play.
    fun list:
    Near a Thousand Tables (crap writing, but good info on the history of food)
    Fabric of the Cosmos and The World is Flat I'll read next for fun. Or The United States of Arugula

    Cuz it keeps me in front of, or at least close to other curators list:
    An Introduction to Hegel's Logic
    The Philosophy of Art (Hegel)
    The Science of Knowing (Fichte)
    And Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (Hume) ( I might not finish this one. Buh. Blah)

    I'm reading Hegel for the first time to read Difference & Repetition (Deleuze) zzzzzzz.....
  12.  
    i just picked up the two reconstructions at bpl. hear that? i went to the boston public library.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
    •  
      CommentAuthorravnos
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008
     
    boundgear:
    DannyRocks:Seit und Zein


    AKA Sein und Zeit?

    I'll play.
    fun list:
    Near a Thousand Tables (crap writing, but good info on the history of food)
    Fabric of the Cosmos and The World is Flat I'll read next for fun. Or The United States of Arugula

    Cuz it keeps me in front of, or at least close to other curators list:
    An Introduction to Hegel's Logic
    The Philosophy of Art (Hegel)
    The Science of Knowing (Fichte)
    And Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding (Hume) ( I might not finish this one. Buh. Blah)

    I'm reading Hegel for the first time to read Difference & Repetition (Deleuze) zzzzzzz.....


    Yes that's what he meant... and Nice phil. list... I haven't read Science of Knowing yet... how is it?Question Reality. "Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear."
    • CommentAuthorboundgear
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008
     
    I'm a fichte fan, so, it's ok. I've been nipple deep in Hegel right now though and I find it filled with boring minutiae and made up german words.
    Also read vocation of man by Fichte, which was hugely influential to Nishida and Nishitani in Kyoto. I've wrote a bunch on the kyoto school while at Tufts, so I had to read Fichte and Kant in depth. I read fichte a few years before that on a whim, and raised my prof's eyebrows when I told him that I already had that book.

    I somehow missed out on reading any Hegel before this. I just skipped him. There is enough writing about hegel, that I could fake it.
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      CommentAuthorMr. Shelby
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008
     
    walter benjamin's art in the age of mechanical reproduction, and deleuze and guattari's anti-oedipus (for the rest of my life, ugh). maybe i'll try fiction again and try to actually finish irvine welsh's glue. i also have a book written by a woman with autism that also has a PhD. and i've been meaning to buy the magazine cabinet again, i have missed a couple of issues.
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      CommentAuthorbuddymike
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008 edited
     
    The Great Gatsby. With my wonderful[cough] public school education I never required to read this book.
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      CommentAuthorMr. Shelby
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008 edited
     
    ^ain't nothing wrong with public school, besides the fights with the schools that are actually in the ghetto (mine just liked to pretend that it was hard as shit... ok, so i did actually have a gun pointed at me once, but still). i think everyone should have to go through public school.
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008 edited
     
    now that people have broken the ice with other smartypants books

    I am also reading some collected writing of Aleksandr Rodchenko and right now I'm debating starting either Rene Girard's Things Hidden Since the Foundation of the World or Paul Ricoeur's The Conflict of Interpretations, but really I should finish reading D&G's Anti-Oedipus first. But I just got the above two books and don't want to wait x(

    Oh shit on a stick, I just saw Pete mentioned the D&G as well. Yeah, I know what you mean, I really like what I have read and I have the two companion volumes (obviously easier to read) as well as A Thousand Plateaus but it can go s l o w. My main focus is on literature though, so I tend to have a handful of nonfiction books going at once anyways to sort of even out the more focused side of my reading.

    I guess I'll stop putzing around and read that instead of starting a new book.
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      CommentAuthorMr. Shelby
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008 edited
     
    ^yeah, since i've started anti-oedipus i've finished about 5 other books, and many many articles, essays, and what not. which companions do you have? i heard theres a good one from rutlidge, but i have only found it for about $115, boooo.
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008
     
    pete, I have Guattari's Anti-Oedipus Papers and Deleuze's Two Regimes of Madness
    • CommentAuthorboundgear
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008
     
    I hate anti oedipus. Or it just might be the sake talking.
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008 edited
     
    by the way pete if you haven't yet, reading Beckett's novels does help in reading AO and vice versa.
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      CommentAuthorravnos
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008
     
    I like anti-Oedipus, it was very interesting.

    If you want to break out the "smart" books. - I'm reading Spinoza's Ethics right now, The complete Dialogs of Plato (ow.. mindfuck), some Liebniz (Just started that, like.. 2 sentences - so tech not really reading it yet, but) and tech. I'm reading Being and Time (or.. Sein und Ziet) but I'm not actually.. just TAing the class...

    the joys of being a Philosophy student...

    I actually skipped hegel too. I've read a good chunk of Heidegger, but no Hegel.
    I'll have to check out Fichte and the Kyoto guys you mentioned.

    Walter benjamin is pretty badass.
    Any of you read any Bergson?Question Reality. "Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear."
    • CommentAuthorboundgear
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008
     
    It's interesting, but just like art/age/mechanical/repo, no matter how interesting, if you have to read it every 3 months in art school there breeds a contempt through familiarity.

    Bergson is out there with James, ie. in the future. I might get to pragmatic stuff in a few years.

    Spinoza was last summer. I like him and his era a lot. I also read Berkeley and some Maimonides last year.

    And if you are not interested in theology, specifically late Vedic Buddhist logic and zen mashed up with kant/fichte/hegel, well, the Kyoto guys will annoy you.
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008 edited
     
    AO is good, it's just written in a style I'm simply not accustomed to. I first tried to read Thousand Plateaus and was just like "body without organs? rhizome? WTF?" and realized I had to start at the beginning.

    Part of reading books like that is also realizing that sometimes you have to put them down for awhile and read a bunch of other stuff before you can competently tackle the material. In literature it's similar but you can read a book without any other knowledge and generally enjoy it, then read a lot more and go back to it and understand a lot more of what was going on. The process is sort of reversed in theory but for someone who didn't get a foundation from classwork it's easily hit-or-miss fumbling in the dark until the right combinations link up. I feel that that process is harder but affords a better understanding of the material since there are no specific deadlines.

    I have been finding that this mostly applies to thinkers from... I dunno, off the top of my head, just after World War One until maybe the early 80s. Not all-inclusive. I find thinkers from other eras easier to understand without said foundation, though obviously once it's achieved they will have and have had a lot more to offer. But they can still be read with some sense of understanding rather than reading words that appear to mean nothing. I first tried D&G before really getting a familiarity with Beckett - I had one, but very cursory. Now that I've read most of his material going back to D&G is... it's a lot easier. It was like reading someone applying the theories of D&G to literature, an explanation of it in a way. But of course D&G came after Beckett.
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008 edited
     
    I am edging towards tipsy so that explanation is pretty meh even for me, but anyways, speaking of D&G related things, Schreber's memoirs are really interesting.
  13.  
    just finished Another Bullshit Night in Suck City, its about boston.its like watching a monkey swallow a hand grenade.
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      CommentAuthorravnos
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008
     
    I actually practice Zen Buddhism... so I think I'll like the kyoto guys.

    I'm actually planning (at some point) to go to grad school for 20th Century Continental Philosophy... aka all these guys. So yeah... I know what you mean meatball.Question Reality. "Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear."
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      CommentAuthorravnos
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008
     
    Off... the topic this thread has devolved into... but they are making (made) Choke (Palahniuk) into a movie apparently? Sam Rockwell is playing main character... which fits (played Zaphod in Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy for those who don't know). I'm actually excited, that was one of my favorites of his books.Question Reality. "Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear."
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      CommentAuthorbuddymike
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008
     
    pete! gigantic:^ain't nothing wrong with public school, besides the fights with the schools that are actually in the ghetto (mine just liked to pretend that it was hard as shit... ok, so i did actually have a gun pointed at me once, but still). i think everyone should have to go through public school.


    I went to a vocational public high school north of Boston with all white kids that thought they were hard as shit. The kids that you can through in some housing projects and would get their asses kicked and the only gunshots they heard are probably from a shooting range. I knew 6 girls that were pregnant before I graduated and one that had 2 kids by graduation. I saw some good fights and plenty of drugs get snorted and smoked. My high school did not have high expectations of anyone.
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeFeb 20th 2008
     
    ok sorry for the deluge but also Sartre's War Diaries are accessible, entertaining, and interesting. forget where I found my copy, don't think I've seen it available new in stores.

    I will shut up now.