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  1.  
    Just started Stardust by Neil Gaiman. After reading many of his other works, I can't believe I didn't start with this one.Naaaah, too uncool for the #messlyfe. I just like to hang out in loading docks and pretend to talk on my radio so that people will like me. - Mfratt
  2.  
    Craig, I have the graphic novel for neverwhere as well as the entire sandman collection, in addition to a lot of other Gaiman novels. Let me know if you want to borrow something.clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  3.  
    I read a bunch of em over the summer, It's fun to see the differences between the book and the graphic novels.Naaaah, too uncool for the #messlyfe. I just like to hang out in loading docks and pretend to talk on my radio so that people will like me. - Mfratt
  4.  
    tinyhonkshus:Whatever happened to that Mark Twain autobiography everyone got excited about?

    i have no idea but i still want to read it.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
  5.  
    ^I googled after I posted. It came out in November and immediately sold out EVERYWHERE.i mean that looks like a 10 cat bag, easy
    •  
      CommentAuthortyler
    • CommentTimeJan 9th 2011 edited
     
    I just finished Demian by Herman Hesse on recommendation by a friend. It was quite a read. It's a strange existential bildungsroman (semi autobiographical) about Emil who begins to genuinely think about his inherited religious beliefs, and onto those of good vs evil after meeting a fellow classmate who inspires him endlessly, as well as complicating his life. It's pretty short (130) and I'd recommend it highly.
    I started Black Mass (the story of Bulger and his connection with the FBI) two days ago, and I'm about 1/3 through. It's actually quite a page turner. I was afraid it would be a lot of fluffed suspense and myriad of mob nicknames, but it's quite easy to follow and really interesting. It's neat to read about a couple of mobsters from Somerville rigging the Lincoln Downs then retiring to Tremont st, etc.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeJan 10th 2011
     
    tinyhonkshus:Whatever happened to that Mark Twain autobiography everyone got excited about?


    i read it and it's great. he goes after preachers, big business and war. not linear at all. he just goes!

    can't wait for the rest of it.

    and it made me go back and read "tom sawyer" and "huckleberry finn".

    mark twain--hero.
    •  
      CommentAuthorjoeyfresh
    • CommentTimeJan 10th 2011
     
    conor!:
    tinyhonkshus:Whatever happened to that Mark Twain autobiography everyone got excited about?

    i have no idea but i still want to read it.

    It was panned pretty hard by Garrison Keillor.
    "Here is a powerful argument for writers’ burning their papers — you’d like to be remembered for “The Innocents Abroad” and “Life on the Mississippi” and the first two-thirds of “Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” and not for excruciating passages of hero worship of General Grant and his son Fred and accounts of your proximity to the general and your business dealings as the publisher of his memoirs, which only reminds the reader that the general wrote a classic autobiography, and you tried to and could not." http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/19/books/review/Keillor-t.html?_r=1&pagewanted=all

    I'm still going to read it eventually, though.We'll get you a cat, don't worry -t-honks
    • CommentAuthorLyzard
    • CommentTimeJan 10th 2011
     

    http://www.amazon.com/Metal-Cowboy-ebook/dp/B004774NVE/
    Finishing this in the next day or so on my Kindle.
    If you want to 'borrow it' you can now for 2 weeks.

    I like his writing.
    Kurmaskie has rode his bike across the world and this collection of stories from the road makes you want dodge the 9to5 and just take off.
    • CommentAuthorspokenword
    • CommentTimeJan 10th 2011
     
    I find that I have to be in a proper mood for Kurmaskie's 'faux-folksy' writing. Especially his early Metal Cowboy stuff. He's got two other books out more recently about biketouring with his kids and those stories are actually fairly sweet and make good use of his style.

    I didn't realize that there was a graphic novel of Neverwhere ... thought it was just the books. I also wished that the Stardust illustrated novel had fabulous pirates.
    • CommentAuthordub
    • CommentTimeJan 14th 2011
     
    Craiginpictures:Just started Stardust by Neil Gaiman. After reading many of his other works, I can't believe I didn't start with this one.

    I'm sorry, I just didn't like this book as much as his other works (not to mention the movie sucked).
    I'm a huge fan of Gaiman's, but I feel like he turned his usual darker materials into a too-fluffy-for-TV parody.

    It's like Gaiman, as written by Hello Kitty. Yea, death, brothers murdering each other, but it's still in such contrast to his typical writing style.I have a two part question: 1. Why is he doing that? And 2. Should we light him on fire.
    •  
      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2011
     
    just finished this:


    interested in borrowing it, joey? it goes over your basic human parasites but puts it in perspective of what humans have done that led to infestation/epidemics, possible historical events that were caused or played out in part due to parasites (battle of jericho), and some other interesting stuff. the info about the parasites themselves isn't anything new, and at times the writing is a bit forced but i found it to be a pretty good read.
  6.  
    http://lickystickypickyme.tumblr.com/post/3105930677/a-rare-parasite-which-burrows-into-host-fish

    my friend just showed me this.

    it eats the fish's tongue!You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
    •  
      CommentAuthorratattack
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2011
     
    haha. i love those little bastards, it's like something out of Men in Black.
  7.  
    ^^creeps me out.clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  8.  
    I'm like 3/4 of the way through dharma bums by kerouac

    not as good as on the road, but definitely still a few scenes that will stay with youthis life may not be for you - ridecrazy
  9.  
    my old bag is the cover of the dharma bums.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeFeb 4th 2011
     
    ^ and ^^"dharma bums" is my bible. i love that book more'n anything EVER.
    and "on the road" is the jam.

    but "dharma bums"? get the fuck OUT!!!!! best book ever. . .
  10.  
    Pale Fire.
    Dharma Bums is seriously so great. I like On The Road more too, but holy shit. So good. Kerouac can't fail. Big Sur = great too.Young, dumb, and full of cum.
    •  
      CommentAuthorjoeyfresh
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2011
     
    ratattack:just finished this:


    interested in borrowing it, joey?

    Yes, please!We'll get you a cat, don't worry -t-honks
    • CommentAuthorgrev
    • CommentTimeFeb 5th 2011
     


    kind of ridiculous, but supposedly one of the greatest sf novels. also, quite prophetic.not another pitcher!
    •  
      CommentAuthorstilgar
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2011
     
    ^dude I read that , and Dune about every year, just to inoculate myself against horrible things.

    The opening line to that book is so fucking good.this wont hurt a bit...
  11.  
    love neuromancer. are the other two any good?YO NOT EVERYBODY GOES TO EAR SCHOOL OK
  12.  
    i think i am going to start 'the autobiography of alice. b toklas' today.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
  13.  
    but i think i want something more exciting.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
    • CommentAuthorgemathy
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2011
     
    I am reading The Screwtape Letters for a book club. When I say "reading" I mean I've read about 6 pages in 2 months and carry the book with me 24 hours a day. If you have read it, can you tell me something, anything, that will make me more excited to read it?

    I saw The Rite last night for inspiration.
    •  
      CommentAuthorstilgar
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2011
     
    banana truffles:love neuromancer. are the other two any good?


    yes, the sprawl series is one of my favorites. Actually I have never hates a book gibson has written, they all are either ok, or awesome.this wont hurt a bit...
    •  
      CommentAuthormrotown
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2011
     
    Neuromancer is awesome, but I hated everything else. Despite being an embarassing star trek nerd, I never really had an interest in written sci fi.e-f-f-e-c-t a smooth operater operating correctly
    • CommentAuthordub
    • CommentTimeFeb 6th 2011
     
    I LOVED Neuromancer (and the entire count zero trilogy). William Gibson is an amazing writer. The only book I didn't like was The Difference Engine - he copies a baroque style a la Neal Stephenson's Systems of the World, and it gets a bit too verbose for my tastes. If you liked Neuromancer, check out Mona Lisa Overdrive and Count Zero - the last two books in the series. If you're looking for something a bit more pulp, but still JUST as great, check out Snow Crash and The Diamond Age by Neal Stephenson. Snow Crash is definitely more pulp action, while The Diamond Age has some EPIC Tolkienesque drama to it, while remaining firmly sci-fi.

    Finally, for all you sci-fi fantasy people, YOU HAVE TO READ "THE NAME OF THE WIND" BY PATRICK ROTHFUSS. The most well-written modern fantasy book I have read in an incredibly long time. Most modern writers are like Brandon Sanderson - great stories, good concepts, but mediocre prose. Rothfuss' syntax is beautifully constructed. His writing isn't just writing - it's art in itself.I have a two part question: 1. Why is he doing that? And 2. Should we light him on fire.
  14.  
    The only book I didn't like was The Difference Engine - he copies a baroque style a la Neal Stephenson's Systems of the World
    dude? seriously? The Difference Engine came out, like, twelve years before Quicksilver. It even predates Snow Crash. To call it a lame copy of Systems of the World is like saying that Joy Division's Unknown Pleasures is a weak ripoff of Interpol's Turn Out the Bright Lights.

    I mean, yeah, The Difference Engine is a weak book in Gibson's canon, and it definitely loses a little something, but let's keep some perspective, yeah?

    I read Neuromancer back in high school -- in the 80's, when the Internet still had more .edu domains than .com's, when calling into Seattle BBS'es from Vancouver to download ASCII translations of the Anarchist Cookbook was kind of futuristic already, two years before a band called Massive Attack released Blue Lines and introduced me to dub and made me believe that this must be what was playing on the Tug Marcus Garvey as it was ferrying Case to the Villa Straylight. It was mindblowing.

    I read it now and it's like an alternate history -- like the Difference Engine. Except, instead of what the late 19th century would've been like if Babbage built a real computer, it was what the 21st century would've been like if Reagan was president for life.

    I am not as hot on GIbson's Blue Ant world. It's like less sugar-happy Cory Doctorow, slices of the alternate future as it was imagined in 2004 or 2008 or 2010.

    While we're talking Cyberpunk, I have this old paperback on my bookshelf -- Bad Voltage by Jonathan Littell. It's basically another cyberpunk heist story ... but European. It involves a bunch of catacomb running, rollerblading Parisian street punks who spend part of their time shooting each other with bottle rockets and bb guns in the Metro tunnels, part of their time rolling or tripping and having drug-fueled orgies in the Pere Lachaise and the other part of their time tussling with gendarmes and megacorp rentacops who are just keeping them down, man. All, while namedropping references to Cabaret Voltaire and Einsturzende Neubauten and Skinny Puppy. It is a total piece of literary trash, but it's also the book that every 18 year old goth/industrial punk kid in 1990 probably wanted to write at some point in time in their lives, and for that it is amazingly awesome.
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2011
     
    ^None of those books you just mentioned interest me in any way and yet you sound like a very smart human. Thanks for that.

    For the record, I'm reading Another Bullshit Night in Suck City, Nick Flynn's memoir about working at the Pine Street Inn during a time that his father was homeless in Boston. I avoided the book for years but now I'm pretty hooked. It's intense, but I recommend.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    •  
      CommentAuthorjoeyfresh
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2011 edited
     
    Another Bullshit Night in Suck City, despite its unfortunate title, is a hell of a read.

    Also, gemathy: Maybe the reason you can't get into The Screwtape Letters is because it sort of sucks. I really tried and couldn't get through it because it's simplistic Christian moral dogma in a threadbare narrative shell. Maybe others can stomach it or find it interesting, but not me. C.S. Lewis is way overrated in my opinion.We'll get you a cat, don't worry -t-honks
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2011
     
    I have a fear of poets writing prose. Despite the fact that some of my favorites (Denis Johnson, Ondaatje, etc.) are exactly that.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
    •  
      CommentAuthorstilgar
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2011
     
    spokenword, that whole thing was amazing. My thoughts exactly. I am reading the latest blue ant book right now, and starting thinking almost the same thing, only "this is just like neromancer, except the main character doesn't have razor fingers, or sweet eyes"this wont hurt a bit...
    • CommentAuthordub
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2011
     
    spokenword:
    The only book I didn't like was The Difference Engine - he copies a baroque style a la Neal Stephenson's Systems of the World
    dude? seriously? The Difference Engine came out, like, twelve years before Quicksilver. It even predates Snow Crash. To call it a lame copy of Systems of the World is like saying that Joy Division's Unknown Pleasures is a weak ripoff of Interpol's Turn Out the Bright Lights.


    Reading comprehension fail. Gibson COPIES THE BAROQUE STYLE...a la Neal Stephenson. This means LIKE Neal Stephenson - not that Gibson is copying Stephenson, but that, LIKE Stephenson, he copies Baroque.I have a two part question: 1. Why is he doing that? And 2. Should we light him on fire.
    •  
      CommentAuthortinhat
    • CommentTimeFeb 7th 2011
     
    did someone say Pale Fire? that book is amazing.
    •  
      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeFeb 8th 2011 edited
     
    stilgar:spokenword, that whole thing was amazing. My thoughts exactly. I am reading the latest blue ant book right now, and starting thinking almost the same thing, only "this is just like neromancer, except the main character doesn't have razor fingers, or sweet eyes"


    Sort of similar.

    in the sprawl series, the characters are cybernetically enhanced unwitting pawns of an energent AI, trying to crack the orbital database managed by the clonal heirs to a secretive fortune.

    in the blue ant series the characters are the brand obsessed pawns of a emerging marketing firm in seek of hipster designer denim.

    One of these is awesome.Troglodytarum is latin for troll
    •  
      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2011
     
    "neotropical companion" by john kricher. cuz my babe's takin' me to costa rica!!!!
    •  
      CommentAuthorstilgar
    • CommentTimeFeb 11th 2011
     
    anything by peter watts, seriously they are all good, but especially the rifters trillogy, the other nice thing is he releases all of his work under a creative commons license on his website so you can read them all online for free.

    just to wet your appetite a bit for starfish (the first in the series), its about a bunch of people with mental problems that have had most of there internal organs replaces with machinery so that they can work on the bottom of an ocean trench minding a geo-thermal power source in the future. They pick people with mental problems because "normal" people can't handle the stress of living in the darkness thousands of feet below the ocean. its so fucked up and awesome.

    Read it now.

    start with starfish, so goodthis wont hurt a bit...
  15.  
  16.  
    Oh, sorry, I thought this was the "What are you listening to now" thread.
  17.  
    i am reading 'the mystery of the hidden driveway' by jennifer l knox. it's good, but i'm not sure if it's up to par with her other collections of poetry. it's different, and it has some real gems, but i find a lot of the poems just sort of wash over me. i'ma reread it, though, before i pass judgement.

    also working on 'no real light' by joe wenderoth, which is good but not as good as his prose poem/short short collection 'letters to wendy's.' but it still has a lot of references to drugs and is openly anti-academia, so that's cool.

    i read 'the two kinds of decay' by sarah manguso, which is a really beautiful account of her battle with a semi-unidentifiable autoimmune disease.

    i finally read 'shoplifting from american apparel' by tao lin, which was hilarious and boring and utterly wonderful and relatable. i only wish young writers would stop trying to copy what they think he's doing because most of them are terrible at it and seem to miss the point completely.

    and some other shit, too.

    borders is going out of business, so you can be damn sure i'ma go to town with their sales.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
    •  
      CommentAuthornerdo
    • CommentTimeFeb 22nd 2011
     
    ^I approve of this message.Worstcase I'll just zip tie on a seat... but i'd rather not. —Zev (who else)
  18.  
    oh, and i've watched this poem a million times already. it's from that huffingtonpost link on your facebook:

    'smoke outside' by ish klein

    i am going to get her book as soon as i can.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
    • CommentAuthorgrev
    • CommentTimeFeb 23rd 2011
     
    not another pitcher!
  19.  
  20.  
    UFOs ARE REAL!DFL and DTF :D:D:D:D
    •  
      CommentAuthorjoeyfresh
    • CommentTimeMar 5th 2011
     
    Unlike them titties.We'll get you a cat, don't worry -t-honks
    • CommentAuthormeetball
    • CommentTimeApr 11th 2011
     
    The pale king, david foster wallace
  21.  
    The Innocents Abroad on free audiobook: http://librivox.org/the-innocents-abroad-by-mark-twain/

    not all librivox readers are good, but this guy is.i mean that looks like a 10 cat bag, easy