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    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2008
     
    http://www.salon.com/books/feature/2008/03/06/robbe_grillet/ interesting
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      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2008
     
    karyatid: 'Guns, Germs and Steel,


    i hate guns germs and steel. it's the worst exercise in post-hoc anaysis of human history i've ever come across. whenever that guy ran into anything that contridicted his theory, he just made up a new rule.

    Just read- down and out in paris and london, which was a quick and excellent read.Troglodytarum is latin for troll
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      CommentAuthorHamburger
    • CommentTimeMar 7th 2008 edited
     
    Just read- down and out in paris and london, which was a quick and excellent read.


    link to bookPeople make decisions.
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      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeMar 8th 2008
     
    "world made by hand" a novel by james howard kunstler. about the not too distant future after the oil runs out. he wrote "the long emergency". a great book as well.
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      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeMar 8th 2008
     
    brunop:"world made by hand" a novel by james howard kunstler. about the not too distant future after the oil runs out.


    That book reminds me of the parables series by octavia butler.Troglodytarum is latin for troll
    •  
      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2008
     
    ^i finished it last night. whoa! the last few chapters were purty intense. highly recommended. very highly.
  1.  
    Everything written after Joyce is rubbish.

    There, I said it.Think you're escaping and run into yourself. Longest way round is the shortest way home.
    • CommentAuthormannnnnn
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2008
     
    What about those authors who are more recent who have been described as Joycean?
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2008
     
    <blockquote><cite> mannnnnn:</cite>What about those authors who are more recent who have been described as Joycean?</blockquote>

    http://www.nyx.net/~awestrop/ftb/ftb.htm
  2.  
    ^^Fakenjoyces, all of them. JJ is the OG.Think you're escaping and run into yourself. Longest way round is the shortest way home.
    •  
      CommentAuthorgregwhits
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2008
     
    i just finished reading the golden compass, it was super quick, i forgot how easy sci-fi/fantasy can read.. maybe i'll finish the other two books by the end of the week. i also just finished reading good omens (neil gaiman, terry pratchett) recently.
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2008
     
    I very greatly disagree that everything written after Joyce is rubbish, specifically the Eastern European literature mainly of the first half of the century, not to mention obviously Pynchon and Gaddis on the other side of the pond. I can't think of writers who really solidified their name since the early 1970s (Gravity's Rainbow was 1972 I believe) off the top of my head. Something that I am still struggling with is the fact that the reason the past seems so much better is that all the shit... well, <i>most</i> of the shit, has been culled, and so, say, when we look back on Russian literature during the 1800s we see Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Gogol, etc... but we don't see all of the massively shit-tarded authors that dominated the era, because they never got passed on. In that vein I have tried to be more receptive to current literature, but generally have been disappointed. I did enjoy U.S.!, however.

    Speaking of Russians, I'm picking up Dostoevsky's Demons to re-read.

    In any case it is impossible to expect each new book to be Joyce. And frankly I'm not sure that Joyce would have been considered anything other than a pretentious nut, had he tried to get Ulysses published today (and god forbid, Finnegans Wake, which I've never read all the way through, though it is an ongoing fascination).

    I get the feeling that the best literature of our era is being produced in other languages than English. I think I mentioned the Finnish postmodern surge earlier (the Dalkey archive has been publishing some of these books I believe). There is also Maxim Kantor from Russia with Handbook of Drawing which has not yet been translated. Wasteland Atlas I found very interesting. And I got this other book at a show once that I now see on the remainder pile, I think it's called It's All That or some shit, a longish book. I only read about 100 pages, though I do intend to go back to it. It had a lot of potential I believe, though I've heard diddly squat about it.
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2008 edited
     
    sorry, I'm a retarded-ass book nerd

    edit: I believe Jose Donoso's Obscene Bird of Night was published later than the 70s... I could be wrong... but that is book you should really check out. Published by Godine, a Boston-based indie publisher that has garnered a lot of recognition. The guy who owned Black Sparrow (owned Bukowski's works) sold his back stock to Godine for $1 and then retired (he also sold Bukowski, I think Auster, and some other author to Houghton Mifflin for his retirement fund :P So Godine didn't get those, unfortunately).
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeMar 10th 2008
     
    nevermind, Obscene Bird of Night was 1970.
    • CommentAuthorraff I el
    • CommentTimeMar 11th 2008
     
    patrick neate's City of Tiny Lights is so good. hard-boiled but thoughtful.

    and i've just started Vellum by Hal Duncan, which from what i've read so far seems really solid and possibly epic.Geryon was a monster everything about him was red.
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2008
     
    Television by Jean-Philippe Toussaint. If there are fans of the Dalkey Archive here, be sure to check out the Harvard Bookstore's remainders basement. A lot of good stuff from Dalkey down there right now.
  3.  
    The Harvard Bookstore has the best remainder and used section. I scout the poetry section once in a while (when I'm not getting free books from my work). Always a good selection despite the small real estate.Word nerd
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      CommentAuthorlingyyy
    • CommentTimeMar 19th 2008
     
    The Stories of Breece D'J Pancake. It's fairly minimalist, beautiful stuff.
    • CommentAuthormannnnnn
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2008
     
    Perfume by Patrick Suskind. I'm not quite half way through, but I wouldn't recommend it based on what I've already read. Am about to Start The Gathering by Anne Enright.
  4.  
    Architecture and the Crisis of Modern Science by Alberto Perez-Gomez. Architectural theory always brings back sweet memories...Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.
    • CommentAuthor...
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2008
     
    ayn rand
    essays in objectivist thought
    • CommentAuthor_
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2008
     
    Astronomy Today, sixth edition. By Eric Chaisson and Steve McMillan.

    My mind is too busy being blown to actually understand it.
    • CommentAuthorgone
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2008
     
    I took a day off today and spent the afternoon finally reading 'Society of the Spectacle' by Guy Ernst Debord, complete with a nap in between Chapters II and III.

    Yessir, it's getting better 'n' better to be me.
    • CommentAuthormannnnnn
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2008
     
    Sounds snazzy.
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2008
     
    ooh-rah for Breece D'J Pancake. A highschooler actually introduced me to that book, since then (a couple of years) this is the first I've heard someone else speak of him. Very good stuff.
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      CommentAuthorlingyyy
    • CommentTimeMar 20th 2008 edited
     
    ^^^ You ever see the film version? Interesting stuff.
  5.  
    Colin: I have the 'sequel' to it, Comments on the Society of the Spectacle if you want to borrow it.Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.
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      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeMar 21st 2008
     
    lingyyy:The Stories of Breece D'J Pancake. It's fairly minimalist, beautiful stuff.


    i thought i was the only one who knew about him. how bout that story with the truck driver who picks people up and hits em with a crow bar or somethin'. it's been awhile since i read him. he was great.
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      CommentAuthorlingyyy
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2008
     
    meatball:ooh-rah for Breece D'J Pancake. A highschooler actually introduced me to that book, since then (a couple of years) this is the first I've heard someone else speak of him. Very good stuff.


    I found out about him in high school too. We read "Trilobites" in one of my English classes, and it blew my naive-"OMG FIGHT CLUB IS TEH SHIT” mind.

    brunop:
    lingyyy:The Stories of Breece D'J Pancake. It's fairly minimalist, beautiful stuff.


    i thought i was the only one who knew about him. how bout that story with the truck driver who picks people up and hits em with a crow bar or somethin'. it's been awhile since i read him. he was great.


    That story in particular is really well developed, considering its length (somewhere around 5 or 6 pages, I think).

    While I'm being a total book nerd and talking about short stories, have any of you read Blow-Up by Julio Cortazar? I'm a fan. I've been meaning to read Hopscotch, but haven't had the time to devote my self to starting a novel because of schoolwork.
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      CommentAuthorMr. Shelby
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2008
     
    ^i think you should kidnap julio cortazar and have him write short stories on a typewriter for you
    •  
      CommentAuthorlingyyy
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2008
     
    ^ Oh, I've tried. But Cortazar's dead, Pete!
    •  
      CommentAuthorMr. Shelby
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2008 edited
     
    so.
    you could totally roboticize his corpse. shit, damien hurst put all those dead animals in big plexiglass containers filled with some sort of fluid, you could do the same, but better! robots, death, and typewriters!
  6.  
    Ayn Rand can suck my dick.

    I'm reading the Autobiography of Miles Davis now.With relish!
    •  
      CommentAuthorbshea81
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2008 edited
     
    ^so good. he and dizzy were pimps. but you must be smoking crack too to be hating ayn rand.fool me once, shame on me. fool me twice, i guess im into trannies
  7.  
    ^hahahahahahahah. Well, I did enjoy Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead. I enjoy her fiction but I'm no 'Subjectivist'. At one point I dug the Virtue of Selfishness, but then again, i was in fact smoking copious amounts of crack and thought her elitist egotism was the answer to all my problems.With relish!
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      CommentAuthorbshea81
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2008
     
    ^ 'objectionist?' agreed though. despite some great work, if she were around today she'd likely be having coffee with anne coulter. but give me a shout if you ever wanna relapse. always looking to add some opiate excitement and rock bottom self hatred to my life.fool me once, shame on me. fool me twice, i guess im into trannies
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      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2008
     
    blarg ayn rand. so many reasons to hate, including the rape-fetish, the anti-feminist views, the glorification of selfishness, the hatred of labor, etc.

    Even her paean to architecture is inherently flawed- the whole idea of building a public building that's full of such genius that other people can't use it is a complete failure.Troglodytarum is latin for troll
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      CommentAuthorbshea81
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2008
     
    and i'm reading catch 22 and a collection of norman mailer pieces right now. whatup highschool.fool me once, shame on me. fool me twice, i guess im into trannies
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      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2008
     
    I just read The Mysteries of Pittsburgh by michael chabon- i like it much more than some of his other books, which mimic the same semi-surreal irresponsibility with much older characters.Troglodytarum is latin for troll
  8.  
    About Ayn Rand and Subjectivism:

    Whether she meant that self-interest and selfishness are one in the same or not, Ayn Rand's teachings permeated the belief systems of many of the now in power in the U.S., the most notable example ('til 2006) is A. Greenspan (not the most caring guyin the world). During the Reagan admin., ideas like those of Ayn Rand caused a shift in public opinion about the role of govt in determining social policy. The biggest change recently concerns national health and welfare programs and the responsibility of government to provide for the old and infirm. Adopting an utopian philosophy as social policy has produced (here in the US for example) a society where greed is not condemned, the condition of the less fortunate is taken as moral failing on their part, and where the willingness to contribute to public projects is swapped by "It's my money, the govt can't tell me what to do with it".

    BUT THAT'S JUST MY OPINION :-)With relish!
    • CommentAuthorraff I el
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2008
     
    ^odd (really "odd" not any of the sarcastic/ironic "odd"s) how that idea of small, non-service-providing government doesn't extend to the military. It's not like rich people don't or can't arrange for their own security, and even if you concede that a strong military is necessary, there's a ridiculous amount of pork there. I'd be tempted to allow Rand-style politics if it meant not spending stupid amounts on what are at best needless pollutants.Geryon was a monster everything about him was red.
    • CommentAuthormeatball
    • CommentTimeMar 24th 2008
     
    reading and enjoying David Markson's Springer's Progress. After this it will be Max Frisch's I'm Not Stiller.

    Ayn Rand was fucking insane.
  9.  
    howl:...the whole idea of building a public building that's full of such genius that other people can't use it is a complete failure.

    ehhhhhh....

    [edit] and for all you Rand fans, soon you'll be able to see 'Atlas Shrugged' on the big screen!Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.
  10.  
    Just about to finish Three Cups of Tea. Former Himalayan climber who starts the Central Asia Institute to build schools in Pakistan. Sounds like it could be cheesy - it's fantastic. Best book I've read in several months.

    Also, just recently read Blood Meridian by Cormac Mccarthy and liked it. Brutally violent, but the Judge is an amazing character.

    The Assist about Charlestown High basketball was pretty good.
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      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeApr 4th 2008
     
    "elmer gantry". book is a fuckin' trip. happy everything to everybody!!
    love, brunop
  11.  
    James Gustafson - Arguments from the Literature - Ethics from a Theocentric Perspective
    Richard McCormick - Physician-Assisted Suicide: Flight from Compassion
    Elliot N. Dorff - Matters of Life and Death - A Jewish Approach to Modern Medical Ethics
    Jonathan Brockopp - The ‘Good Death’ in Islamic Theology and Law - Islamic Ethics
    Susan Wolf - Gender, Feminism, and Death: Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia
    and
    The Oregon Death with Dignity Act - 1997clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  12.  
    ^boooooooring
  13.  
    sorry.
  14.  
    endurancenirvana:Also, just recently read Blood Meridian by Cormac Mccarthy and liked it. Brutally violent, but the Judge is an amazing character.


    he does hug a man to death!Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn.
  15.  
    endurancenirvana:^boooooooring

    Eh, I find it pretty fascinating personally as that's the realm of bioethics I am interested in.

    endurancenirvana:sorry.

    Is ok. I can't stay mad at you.clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!