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    • CommentAuthormeetball
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2009
     
    I mean seriously if you ever want to feel the blinding urge to knock someone the fuck out go to a TC Boyle reading. That guy is a fucking dipshit and a half.

    Murakami on the other hand, while he writes nonsense, is self-effacing, funny, and nice, and I can't begrudge him his success.
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      CommentAuthortinhat
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2009
     
    happyraindrops:


    holy shit, what a weird coincidence. i came here to say i'd been reading the third volume: The Guermantes Way. i've only met two other people who've read the series, both in their sixties. one a creepy old journalist who sort-of-stalked me for a while, and one a completely deranged ex-hippy who claims he read most of it while tripping on acid (i believe him).

    for anyone who wants to read it but isn't sure: there is a section in the first book called Swann in Love that pretty much stands alone and gives an easily digestible preview of what the rest of the books feel like. i think you can even buy it by itself.
  1.  
    ffffffuckoffffff:
    happyraindrops:


    holy shit, what a weird coincidence. i came here to say i'd been reading the third volume: The Guermantes Way. i've only met two other people who've read the series, both in their sixties. one a creepy old journalist who sort-of-stalked me for a while, and one a completely deranged ex-hippy who claims he read most of it while tripping on acid (i believe him).

    for anyone who wants to read it but isn't sure: there is a section in the first book called Swann in Love that pretty much stands alone and gives an easily digestible preview of what the rest of the books feel like. i think you can even buy it by itself.


    nice! you are much further than me... slow and steady :)
    • CommentAuthormeetball
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2009
     
    I'm curious to know what you find in that book. I have never managed to make it far. On multiple occasions I've taken the whole work as my only reading on a road trip and I srsly still can't get past page 100 before keeling over.
    • CommentAuthormeetball
    • CommentTimeJan 27th 2009
     
    FYI I consider that to be a pretty BS reason to pan a book so I'd actually like to know. So many people say they've read it but never say shit about it other than that their afternoon reminded them of Proust, or their childhood mirrored Proust's, or that for some reason (unmentioned) Proust was influential to their writing.
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      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2009
     
    ol' 'nop's read all o' proust. i read it all in thailand about ten years ago. i enjoyed the hell out of it. it's subtle and funny. ya jus' gotta get into the rhythm of it. as yall can see, my prose style has been greatly influenced by ol' marcel. him and nabokov. natch.
  2.  
    i tried reading 'war and peace' once for no other reason than to say 'i've read 'war and peace'' about half-way through i decided fuck it and haven't picked it up since

    and meetball, you'd better start backing up your anti-Roth comments. admittedly i'm not huge on his more recent stuff, but earlier roth is excellent and i draw a clear connection between him and bellow.
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      CommentAuthorMorgie
    • CommentTimeJan 28th 2009
     
    hannaelise:



    fuck chuck klosterman... dude's a total tool, after Sex, Drugs, and Cocopuffs he thinks he's some sorta pop culture god.
  3.  
    meetball:I'm curious to know what you find in that book. I have never managed to make it far. On multiple occasions I've taken the whole work as my only reading on a road trip and I srsly still can't get past page 100 before keeling over.


    brunop's right about getting into the rhythm. I like how Proust describes things that everybody experiences, how he can make them unique and significant. After reading Proust for a while I find myself just staring at random stuff and daydreaming a lot. So I can't really explain exactly what makes it so good, but it is.
  4.  
    happyraindrops:
    meetball:I'm curious to know what you find in that book. I have never managed to make it far. On multiple occasions I've taken the whole work as my only reading on a road trip and I srsly still can't get past page 100 before keeling over.


    brunop's right about getting into the rhythm. I like how Proust describes things that everybody experiences, how he can make them unique and significant. After reading Proust for a while I find myself just staring at random stuff and daydreaming a lot. So I can't really explain exactly what makes it so good, but it is.


    after reading 'Ulysses' i found myself always conscious of what it was i just thought and of how i look at things..what my thought process would look like laid out on paper.
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      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2009
     
    i'm readin' me some john updike now. he makes even white folk interestin'.
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      CommentAuthormrotown
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2009
     
    e-f-f-e-c-t a smooth operater operating correctly
    •  
      CommentAuthortinhat
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2009
     
    i wouldn't recommend proust to everyone. i think he mostly appeals to daydreamers, folks who take things slowly and think a lot (more than they should, probably). on the surface, his experiences are completely irrelevant to our generation but on a deeper level he describes humanity in a way that everyone can understand. so many times i've read a comparison he's made and felt that it made something that seemed indescribable make sense.

    i love it because, as happyraindrops says, he makes small moments in everyday life significant and interesting. his style is really beautiful too. it's almost stream of conscious, but not in the way of Joyce, for instance. i think he really defines what art is to me: making life meaningful in some way. when you finally fall into his rhythm, the words disappear. i can only compare it to playing music with other people, when suddenly everything clicks and time stops and when the song ends you have to take a deep breath because you felt like you just dreamed it. or good sex, too.

    happyraindrops: that's the best way to approach it. i have no intention of finishing any time soon. when i'm done with The Guermantes Way i'm going to read other things and only when i'm ready will i read the next one. there's no rush, and especially because it's unlikely i'll ever read them again, i'd rather savor it instead of suffer through it.
    • CommentAuthormeetball
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2009
     
    have you read Dostoevsky?
    • CommentAuthormeetball
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2009 edited
     
    OK, I understand the rhythm explanation even if I don't agree, because I have used that to explain my enjoyment of both Pynchon and Gaddis. But I have to say that I don't think it is a particularly strong defense of a work.

    re: Roth - far from a Roth expert here, I'm just unwilling to read thirty thousand goddamn books just to figure out I still don't like the guy. What do you recommend - Operation Shylock is the only one off the top of my head that I feel I should revisit.
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      CommentAuthortinhat
    • CommentTimeJan 29th 2009
     
    i've read Crime and Punishment and the Brothers Karamazov. both were terrible translations, but i still dug them a lot. i don't think i can agree with everything dostoevsky has to say about people but i think he's an amazing story-teller.

    speaking of russian lit, a coworker gave me her copy of anna karenina. anyone read it? is it worth it as an introduction to tolstoy? the translation seems legit enough (Richard Peaver and Larissa Volokhonsky).
  5.  
    ^i have, but i didn't really enjoy it. i found it really very tedious, but then again i thought the same thing about the proust passages i had to read in my french lit classes and have just never been a big fan of tolstoy (or late 19th/early 20th century lit, in general). however, that being said, i think that if that is where your get your reading kicks you will be very happy.
    • CommentAuthorboundgear
    • CommentTimeJan 30th 2009
     
    I hate crime/punishment and karamazov. Those are 2/3 of the books that I start and can't finish. (3/3 = catch 22) I blame the translation too. I hope and believe that they suck in translation only. It seems to matter how it was written more than what, so that would make translation paramount. I love me some Gogol though. Dead Souls is a great book.

    I'm reading "An Encyclopedia of an Ordinary Life" and it's perfect before bed when my brain is tired. No profundity yet. Perfect for tired brain. does have an interesting structure that I am trying to figure out how/if she is going to make it novel-ey.
  6.  
    catch-22 is great...not amazing thought, just great.

    for roth, portnoy's complaint and goodbye,columbus are both decent starters...again, i'm not huge on his more recent work, but i like the corrolation between his earlier stuff and that of saul bellow.

    and i know i'll get flak for this, but I CANNOT STAND 19TH/EARLY 20TH CENTURY RUSSIAN AUTHORS! they all come off as exactly the same to me; writing about the same topics and the same problems. i did like 'notes from underground' though. a friend of mine read it first senior year of high school and was like 'dude, you need to read this book. the protagonist is a lot like you;...i don't know what that says though.
    • CommentAuthormeetball
    • CommentTimeJan 30th 2009
     
    See Portnoy's was my starter and it didn't really get me down with looking much further.
  7.  
    ah, i started with 'goodbye,columbus' and went from there.
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      CommentAuthormrotown
    • CommentTimeJan 30th 2009
     
    Read Isaac Babel's "red cavalry"
    Very solid early 20th century Russian Lit.
    Or for something a few decades later go after Vasily Grossman's "Life & Fate", but that's a monster book.e-f-f-e-c-t a smooth operater operating correctly
    • CommentAuthormeetball
    • CommentTimeJan 30th 2009
     
    And a great book, Life & Fate is a great book.

    Der Nister's The Family Mashber is another great. Both don't seem to be very talked about because I hadn't heard about them before finding them both on clearance.
  8.  
    i read 'life and fate' as a supplementary reading in a history of ww2 seminar
  9.  
    Fiskadoro by Denis JohnsonWord nerd
  10.  
  11.  
    i read 'deadeye dick' on slow days. it was good.

    now i'm reading 'iceman cometh,' and i think i might try 'the world according to garp' per recommendation from a friend.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
  12.  
    i liked 'deadeye dick'
    'iceman cometh' rules, though i've never seen it live (5 hours, 2 intermissions). 'moon for the misbegotten' is also a good oneill play
  13.  
    Right now, re-reading all my course notes over the past 2 years for my comp exam tomorrow. Fuck.

    Also reading some UN Treaties for my Human Rights course exam.clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
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      CommentAuthorpapi
    • CommentTimeApr 29th 2009
     
    Ernest Hemingway: A Life Story

    never been a big Hemingway fan, but it was a gift and I do have a hard time reading fiction these days.I'm going to eat your brain and gain your knowledge
  14.  
    You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
    • CommentAuthorboundgear
    • CommentTimeOct 3rd 2009
     
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      CommentAuthorJennyBee
    • CommentTimeOct 3rd 2009
     
    Just read "Fraction of the Whole" by Steven Toltz. It was exciting and held my attention through most of it. It was his first book, so there are flaws, but it is worth reading if you have time (it is also wicked long).
  15.  
    reread brave new world for about the 10th time. Love that book. Also, The Road by cormac Mccarthy.'Cause i always say i love you when i mean turn out the lights.
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      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeOct 3rd 2009
     
    conor!:


    i love you conor. not in a fag way though.
    • CommentAuthorgrev
    • CommentTimeOct 3rd 2009
     
    not another pitcher!
  16.  
    brunop:
    conor!:


    i love you conor. not in a fag way though.

    http://writing.upenn.edu/pennsound/x/Berrigan.php

    excellent reading.You're purposefully attempting to sabotage my degree project. Thanks.
  17.  
    I just finished a really good article on Michael Haneke by Anthony Lane.

    Screen shot 2009-10-04 at 8.36.19 PM
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      CommentAuthorcdrebbel
    • CommentTimeOct 5th 2009
     
    Now this is a thread that I'm very happy to see ressurrected . Kudos, (Conor!)!




    Move them legs.Fuck yeah.
    •  
      CommentAuthorbrunop
    • CommentTimeOct 6th 2009
     
    ^yeah dude. great book about runnin'.
    • CommentAuthorgemathy
    • CommentTimeOct 8th 2009
     


    I'm reading this. no lie. And I love it.
  18.  


    Haikus are keeping me sane.clockwork ted: this is my favorite thread. sweet BJ alexi!
  19.  

    Therapeutic to the greatest extent possible.Girls on bikes really turn my crank
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      CommentAuthorhowl
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2009
     


    WWI, the prequel.Troglodytarum is latin for troll
    •  
      CommentAuthornadz
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2009 edited
     
    kafka_on_the_shoreand so on and so forth
    • CommentAuthorCarter
    • CommentTimeOct 9th 2009
     
    Diamonds Are ForeverIt's not francois' fault that you weren't looking hard enough.
  20.  
    roygbiv:kafka_on_the_shore


    Murakami's best.
    • CommentAuthormeetball
    • CommentTimeOct 10th 2009
     
    Reading Correction by Thomas Bernhard, to be followed by Jean-Phillippe Toussaint's The Bathroom, and then to Three Novels by Bernhard.
  21.  
    What a bunch of faggots...

    "Hey guys, I read Vonnegut."

    "Well, I read Proust."

    "You should care what I say because I claim to be able to read."

    "Isn't it great that we identify with each other by not actually having a conversation but with the mere simple act of bragging back and forth about shit that hundreds of thousands of people already read in the 70's. Congratulations to us."
  22.  
    I mean, look at this nonsense:

    kilgore_trout:and meetball, you'd better start backing up your anti-Roth comments. admittedly i'm not huge on his more recent stuff, but earlier roth is excellent and i draw a clear connection between him and bellow.


    It's not even like you guys are trying to give people good recommendations for stuff to read but rather flat out telling us that we have to do what you say because you said it. what a joke. "you better"... look at this high falutin' nonsense that is this 'what am i reading' thread. what, am i supposed to identify you with vonnegut now because you claim to know what's what and use his character's name as a handle? i can't decide what's more embarassing for the owner of the avatar, your name or that 20 year old on here whose handle is '30ofpabst' and posts missed connections to girls he saw on their bikes.